- - ABC-INDEX - -

12/31/2017

Welcome !

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Welcome to O-Mamori ! お守り and Mingei 民芸 ! 

The rich world of Japanese amulets and talismans,
sold at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrine all over Japan.




The folk art and folk craft of Japan with its many folk toys (gangu 玩具)
has produced many small items to protect from illness, bring good luck and money and wish for general happiness for the family.
Introducing regional monsterlins, ghosts and demons and how people coped with them.
Introducing miniatures of figures from festivals and rituals and much more !


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. . - - - - ABC - INDEX - - - - . .

- AAA - / - BBB - / - CCC - / - DDD - / - EEE -

- FFF - / - GGG - / - HHH - / - I I I - / - JJJ -

- KK KK - / - LLL - / - MMM - / - NNN - / - OOO -

- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XYZ -


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. General Information . Essays .



. Join the Ukiyo-E friends on facebook ! .




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Amulets from Shrines and Temples
. Shinsatsu 神札 , Mamorifuda 守り札 .


How to make a wish come true . . .
. Gankake 願掛け wish-prayer, to make a wish .


Little things for good luck
. Engimono 縁起物


Folk Art and Folk Craft
. mingei 民芸 and folk craft museums

. minzokugaku 民俗学 / 民族学 folklore studies, ethnology .


Kyoodoo gangu 郷土玩具 Kyodo Gangu Folk Toys
. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .
- From Hokkaido to Okinawa -


Regional monsters and demons
. Yookai 妖怪 Yokai monsters, demons - Introduction
yuurei 幽霊 Yurei, ghost
bakemono 化け物  o-bake お化け


Furusato, home village, home town, Heimat
This is where you feel at home, where the ancestors are close by, where everything is all right. It is an emotion deep inside the Japanese soul.
. Furusato ふるさと, 故郷、古里 .


. Festivals, Ceremonies, Rituals . SAIJIKI

. Kami to Hotoke - the Deities of Japan .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples .


. WASHOKU - Regional Dishes from Japan


. Reference, Books . . . .


Your guide is

Dr. Gabi Greve
Okayama Japan

. Daruma Museum Japan .


- - - The alphabetical Daruma index: - - -
Use your browser to find a keyword.

. Contents A - C . - - - . Contents D - F .
. Contents G - J . - - - . Contents K .
. Contents L - N . - - - .Contents O - R .
. Contents S . - - -  . Contents T - Z .








. Join the MINGEI group on facebook ! .

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This BLOG is dedicated to
the brave people of Tohoku, after March 11, 2011

. Japan after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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- - - - - - #omamori #mingei #folklore #folkart #legendsofjapan -
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12/30/2017

- Omamori - INFO

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quote
Omamori (御守, o-mamori)
are Japanese amulets dedicated to particular Shinto deities as well as Buddhist figures. The word mamori (守り) means protection, with omamori being the polite sonkeigo form of the word mamoru, "to protect".

Design and function

The amulet covering is usually made of cloth and encloses papers or pieces of wood or paper with prayers written on them which are supposed to bring good luck to the bearer on particular occasions, tasks or ordeals. Omamori are also used to ward off bad luck and are often spotted on bags, hung on cellphone straps, in cars, etc. for safety in travel. Many omamori are specific in design to the location they were made.

They often describe on one side the specific area of luck or protection they are intended for and have the name of the shrine or temple they were bought at on the other. Generic omamori exist, but most of them cover a single area: health, love, or studies, to name only a few. It is said that omamori should never be opened or they lose their protective capacities. Amulets are replaced once a year to ward off bad luck from the previous year. Old amulets are usually returned to the shrine or temple so they can be disposed of properly.

Modern commercial uses
There are modern commercial versions for these that are typically not spiritual in nature and are not issued by a shrine or temple. They do not confer protection or need to be replaced every year. It has become popular for stores in Japan to feature generic omamori with popular characters such as Mickey Mouse, Hello Kitty, Snoopy, Kewpie, etc.



Some popular omamori are:

Kanai Anzen: For good health and help with illness.
Kōtsū Anzen: Protection for drivers and travelers of all sorts.
En-musubi: Available for singles and couples to ensure love and marriage.
Anzan: Protection for pregnant women during term and to ensure a safe and easy delivery.
Gakugyō Jōju: for students and scholars.
Shōbai Hanjō: Success in business and matters of money.

source : WIKIPEDIA


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People go to a temple or shrine and pray or make a vow for something special.
They hope their prayers will be heared and richess, health etc. bestowed upon them.

goriyaku, go riyaku 御利益, ご利益 reward
receiving merits and benefits


Vows and prayers must be sincerely petitioned and gratitude must be shown if a wish is granted.
Otherwise there will be a divine retribution (tatari 祟り 。たたり)


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special fuda talismans, shinpu 神符
taima たいま(大麻), oonusa おおぬさ
gofu, gofuu 護符/御符




gohei 御幣(ごへい)strips of white paper on a wand
used to purify a place or person by waving over it.


nusa 幣(ぬさ)
They come in many variations, according to the shrine and deity they are used for.

quote
Gohei
A kind of ritual wand; one type of heihaku, also called heisoku. Originally gohei were identical to cloth offerings called mitegura, but the term gradually came to be used in today's more narrow sense. Gohei are made by attaching zig-zag strips of gold, silver, white or multicolored (five-color) paper to a staff (called a heigushi) made of bamboo or other wood.

Originally, offerings of cloth were presented to the kami by attaching them to a staff, and this practice forms the origin for today's customary gohei. Also, while rectangular paper was used at first, the custom later developed of attaching streamers called shide to the sides.

Originally an offering to the kami, gohei stood deep within the sanctuary and came to be viewed as a mishōtai, an object in which the spirit of the kami resided, or else were placed before the kami as a decoration similar to mirrors, or were used as implements with which to purify worshipers at the shrine.
source : Motosawa Masashi, Kokugakuin, 2005



For some festivals there is a special
. gohei no atama kazari 御幣の頭飾り headgear with gohei decoration .




In Red and White, koohaku 紅白 for extra power.


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. Shimenawa 注連縄 a sacred rope .



MORE about

. Shinsatsu 神札 , Mamorifuda 守り札 .

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Have your own O-Mamori made
Produced by 池上實相寺 ikegami jissouji
- reference : omamo.me/ -

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12/29/2017

. . . Regional Toys . . . LIST

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. Regional Daruma Dolls from Japan .


  


Regional Folk Toys - From Hokkaido to Okinawa

日本の郷土玩具 gangu
日本のおもちゃ omocha


Use "MY LABLES" on the right side to find the entries.


CLICK for more photos



This BLOG is dedicated to the brave people of Tohoku.

. Japan after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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HOKKAIDO 北海道 [ 道北 道東 道央 道南 ]

. HOKKAIDO . and . AINU .

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TOHOKU 東北 [ 青森 岩手 宮城 秋田 山形 福島 ]

. AKITA .

. AOMORI .

. FUKUSHIMA .

. IWATE .

. MIYAGI .

. YAMAGATA .


DARUMA after the great earthquake of March 11, 2011

. Tohoku Daruma .


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KANTO 関東
[ 東京 神奈川 埼玉 千葉 茨城 栃木 群馬 ]

. CHIBA .

. GUNMA, GUMMA .

. IBARAKI / IBARAGI .

. KANAGAWA - Yokohama - Kamakura .

. SAITAMA .

. TOCHIGI - Nikko .

. TOKYO - Edo .


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. . . . . Chubu, Chuubu Chihoo 中部地方





SHINETSU 信越 [ 新潟 長野 ]

. NAGANO .

. NIIGATA .

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HOKURIKU 北陸 [ 富山 石川 福井 山梨 ]

. FUKUI .

. ISHIKAWA .

. TOYAMA .

. YAMANASHI .


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TOKAI 東海 [ 愛知 岐阜 静岡 ]

. AICHI - Nagoya .

. GIFU . Hida, Mino .

. SHIZUOKA .


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KINKI / KANSAI 近畿 [ 大阪 兵庫 京都 滋賀 奈良 和歌山 三重 ]

. HYOGO - Kobe, Himeji .

. KYOTO, Kyooto, Kioto .

. MIE - Ise Shrine .

. NARA .

. OSAKA .

. SHIGA .

. WAKAYAMA Kishu .


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CHUGOKU CHIHO 中国 [鳥取 島根 岡山 広島 山口 ]
Western Japan 西日本 Nishi Nihon


. HIROSHIMA .

. OKAYAMA .

. SHIMANE .

. TOTTORI .

. YAMAGUCHI .


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SHIKOKU 四国 [ 徳島 香川 愛媛 高知 ]

. EHIME .

. KAGAWA .

. KOCHI (Koochi, Tosa) .

. TOKUSHIMA - AWA .


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KYUSHU Kyuushuu 九州
[ 福岡 佐賀 長崎 熊本 大分 宮崎 鹿児島 ]

. FUKUOKA - Hakata - Kita-Kyushu .

. KAGOSHIMA (Satsuma) .

. KUMAMOTO .

. MIYAZAKI, MIYASAKI .

. NAGASAKI .

. OITA .

. SAGA .


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.OKINAWA 沖縄 . Ryukyu 琉球 .


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. WASHOKU .
Regional Dishes from Japan



. O MATSURI お祭り .
Regional Festivals from Japan



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2/20/2017

imono metal art

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imono 鋳物 ironware, cast iron, metal art
chuukin 鋳金 Chukin, metal casting


quote
Having had its foundation laid in antiquity, metal craft using both precious and non-precious materials has achieved a high degree of refinement in Japan. Despite its superb quality, metalwork does not enjoy the renown of other Japanese crafts.
source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/category/crafts/metal

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. hoochoo 包丁 Hocho knives .
- waboochoo 和包丁 Wabocho Japanese knives

. tetsubin 鉄瓶 iron kettles .
Iwate Nanbu Tekki

. tsuiki 鎚起, tsuikin 鎚金 hammered metal ware, metalware .
tankin 緞金 beating gold
Also called tanzoo 緞造, uchimono 打物, tsuikin 鎚金 and kaji 鍛冶
Tsubame Tsuiki Dooki 燕鎚起銅器 Tsuiki Doki : hammered metal ware from Tsubame town, Niigata


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- - - - - quotes from JAANUS - - - - -

chuukin 鋳金 - chukin
Metal casting. A technique used in metalwork to produce vessels or sculptures by melting down metal and pouring it into a mould. Metals used for casting include gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, lead, aluminium, and a variety of alloys. Bronze makes a particularly good casting metal and is highly resistant to corrosion. The casting process can be divided into three stages: i) making the mould, ii) pouring in the molten metal, iii) the finishing stage. Stages ii) and iii) are common to all cast-metal works, but stage i) varies, as there are a great many materials and methods which can be used to make the casting mould igata 鋳型. The best-known methods include:
1 
Stone mould casting *ishigata 石型, which was used to make bronze objects such as the Yayoi period halberd and doutaku 銅鐸 (bell-shaped bronze). Molten bronze was poured into a mould carved into a block of sandstone.
2 
Lost-wax casting *rougata 蝋型 roogata, rogata, was the method used for all bronze sculptures produced from the sixth to the twelfth centuries. A clay model of the images was made as a core, and this was then covered with a layer of beeswax, on which surface features of the image were modelled. Then another layer of clay was added to make an outer shell. Pins were inserted connecting the inner and outer shell, and the entire mould was fired. The wax melted and ran out, leaving an empty space, which was filled with molten bronze. When the bronze cooled and hardened the outer shell and inner core were removed. The surface of the statue was then finished with a chisel, and often gilded with an amalgam of gold and mercury.
3
*Sougata 総型 soogata, sogata, was a casting technique where the surface pattern was engraved on the inside of a clay mould and an inner core *nakago 中型, also made of clay but reduced in size according to the desired thickness of the metal object, was enclosed. After firing, melted metal was poured into the space between the outer mould and the inner core. An adaptation of sougata was kezuri-nakago-chuuzou 削り中型鋳造 (casting with a scraped-off mould). A clay core was covered by a second layer of clay which formed the outer mould. The outer mould was then removed from the core, and the surface of the core was scraped away, according to the desired thickness of the object. The outer mould was then replaced and molten metal poured into the space created by the scraping, between the outer mould and inner core.
4 
Replica casting *fumigaeshi 踏返 was a method used to produce a copy of a flat, simple metal object, for example a mirror. The original object was covered with clay to make a mould. The copy was then made by casting in the clay mould. The dimensions of the duplicate were slightly smaller, and the design less clear than that of the original.
5 
Another technique known as *komegata 込型 (sealed mould), or warikomegata 割込型 (sectioned sealed mould) used a clay mould applied directly over a wood, clay, or stone model of the statue. After firing or simply drying, the mould was divided into pieces and reassembled for casting. This method permitted fine details to be reproduced on the mould, and also had the advantage that it was possible to preserve the original model undamaged.
6 
The simplest casting method used in Japan, suitable for objects like coins or mirrors was the sand mould *sunagata 砂型. Sand was contained in a wooden or metal frame. A raw clay model of the desired object was pressed into the sand. Molten metal was then poured into the hollow impressed in the sand. This method began to be used in the Edo period. The earliest metal casting in Asia began in ancient China for making ceremonial bronze vessels, and later the technique was highly developed for the production of mirrors and Buddhist statues. In Japan important uses included Buddhist statues and implements,temple bells, mirrors, and the iron kettle used in the tea ceremony.

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kigata imono 木型鋳物
A method of metal casting using a wooden model. The wooden model was called kigata 木型.
The kigata was carved first, and over this a clay mould (sometimes called *megata 雌型) was made, which was then used for casting. Recent research suggests that the kigata imono method was used in the production of all gilt bronze images during and after the Late Heian period.

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rougata 蝋型 rogata
Also rougata chuuzou 蝋型鋳造, rougata imono 蝋型鋳物. A method of metal casting known as the lost-wax technique. Frequently used in Japan for casting bronze statues, which were often gilded. See *kondou 金銅. First, a basic model of the desired vessel or statue was made in clay or plaster. This was then covered with a layer of beeswax mixed with pine resin, which was moulded to the required shape and engraved with surface details. An outer layer of soft clay or plaster was then applied over the wax. The outer clay mould and the inner model were secured from the sides, or at the front and back, using fragments of metal *katamochi 型持 or metal pins *kougai 笄. The entire construction was then fired, causing the mould to harden and the wax to melt and run out. Melted metal was poured into the gap left by the wax, between the outer mould and the inner core. When the metal had cooled and hardened the statue was removed from the inner and outer moulds, and the marks left by the pins were repaired. See *ikake 鋳掛.
Solid metal statues were produced from a model made directly from wax without an inner core. This model was then covered, fired and cast.
The lost-wax method allowed free modelling, as the wax surface was very easy to work, and was suitable for casting complex forms and intricate detail. It produced a beautifully smooth, sculptural surface in bronze.
In Japan the lost-wax method was used from the 6c, beginning with small gilt-bronze statues of the Asuka and Nara periods such as the Shoukannonzou 聖観音像 in Yakushiji 薬師寺, Nara. Most of Japan's early bronze statues are believed to have been made by this method. Its use continued during and after the Heian period, and the same technique was used to make small decorative carvings *netsuke 根付 in the Edo period.

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chuuzou 鋳造 chuuzoo, chuzo - - - Also imono 鋳物.
Casting. A technique used to make cast sculptural forms. The base material was heated and melted down to a liquid, which was poured into a mould, igata 鋳型. This was then left to harden and the mould removed to leave a solid form. Metal, plaster, clay or glass could be cast in this way. The term chuuzoubutsu 鋳造仏 refers to cast Buddhist images. *Chuukin 鋳金 refers specifically to metal casting, but since metal was the material most commonly associated with cast images, the terms chuuzou and imono are often used interchangeably with chuukin.


kondou 金銅 kondoo, kondo - gilt bronze
- source : JAANUS : imono -

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- ABC - List of metal work from the Prefectures
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................................................................................ Ishikawa 石川県  

. kinpaku 金沢金箔 gold foil, gold leaf foil .
Kanazawa haku 金沢箔 leaf foil of gold, silver or platinum


................................................................................ Kanagawa 神奈川県  

. Odawara imono 小田原 鋳物 Odawara casting .


................................................................................ Kumamoto 熊本県   

. Higo zoogan 肥後象嵌 Higo Zogan inlay .


................................................................................ Niigata 新潟県  

. roogata chuukin 蝋型鋳金 wax casting .
Sado Island

. tsuiki 鎚起, tsuikin 鎚金 hammered metal ware, metalware .
Tsubame town 燕

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................................................................................ Osaka 大阪   

Osaka suzuki 大阪錫器 Osaka tin ware



6 Chome-6-15 Tanabe, Higashisumiyoshi Ward, Osaka / 大阪錫器 company
- reference source : osakasuzuki.co.jp -

- quote -
Osaka Naniwa tin ware
There are many kinds of drinking cups around the world. While the West offers various types of glassware, and Asia has a preference for ceramic cups, in Japan a tin cup style known as suzu-ki (tinware) can also be found in production.

Used since prehistoric times, tin was introduced to Japan by Kenzuishi, a Japanese envoy to Sui Dynasty China, and Kentoshi, a Japanese envoy to Tang Dynasty China, between the seventh and ninth centuries. Thereafter, tin began to be produced in Japan as well. But at the time, it was a material valued like gold and silver are today, so it was only used in limited settings, including the imperial court.

In the Edo Period (1603-1868), tinware became popular among the general public in the form of drinking cups and Japanese tea sets. By the middle of the period, the manufacture and sale of tinware began to center on parts of Osaka, with strong distribution channels in areas such as Shinsaibashi and Tenjinbashi. This heralded the beginning of Osaka Naniwa tinware.



While Naniwa tinware quickly evolved into a full-fledged industry, the start of World War 2 led many craftsmen to be drafted, and material procurement became difficult, plunging the technique into crisis. Following the war, craftsmen from around Osaka gathered to maintain the tradition of Osaka Naniwa tinware, and the industry was reborn. It was recognized by the Japanese government as a traditional craft in 1983.

Tinware is used for a wide variety of products due to its combination of practicality and aesthetic appeal. It is characterized by strong ion properties that have purifying effects on liquids, particularly removing zatsumi (unfavorable taste) from saké to make it smooth and delicious. Tin is also reputed for moisture protection, and is said to help maintain the freshness of tea leaves, making it suited for drinking cups, pots and teacups. Also, given its beautiful, clean color, it’s used for various products including cassolettes, cinnabar seal ink cases, Buddhist or Shinto religious instruments, and decorations.

Osaka Naniwa tinware boasts a tin percentage of more than 97 percent, and this high degree of purity truly brings out the benefits of tin.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts/metal -

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................................................................................ Toyama 富山県  

Takaoka imono 高岡鋳物 Takaoka metal ware



- quote -
Takaoka Casting
Each area in Japan is rooted with its own unique metal industry, and in Takaoka, Toyama Prefecture, a wide range of metal casting techniques such as bronze, alloy and tin have been developed. Bronze in particular accounts for 95% of the production nationwide.

Takaoka-Imono emerged from a town called Kanaya machi located along the Senbogawa river in Takaoka city, Toyama Prefecture. In 1609, Maeda Toshinaga, the second head of Kaga Domain and builder of a castle in Takaoka, invited seven Imoji artisans in hope of revitalizing the local industry.

The production of Imono using copper alloy became particularly popular around the 18th century. In 1873, at the Weltausstellung 1873 Wien, Kanamori Soshichi, who ran his own Imono production factory and exported his products, was awarded a prize, which led to more artisans in the country receiving awards, and Imono establishing its status globally. In 1975, it was certified as a Traditional Craftwork by the national government, and has since been used for the creation of a wide variety of products, with new crafting techniques constantly emerging.


source : 4travel.jp/travelogue
- 藤子不二雄 - まんが道 Manga Road in Takaoka -

Takaoka-Imono
has recently been adopted for the production of bronze statues of popular manga characters, which have then been placed in various parts of Japan. For the past few years, local municipalities and people in shopping arcades in the metropolitan area have begun to place bronze statues of popular manga characters as part of their plan to revitalize their communities. In March, 2010, 11 statues of characters from the popular manga most commonly known as Kochikame were placed around the Kameari station in Katsushika Ward, Tokyo. In March, 2012, 12 statues of “family” characters from “Sazae-san”, a ubiquitous manga/anime series that depicts the everyday life of one family, were put in place around the Sakura-shinmachi station of the Tokyu Denen-toshi line as part of the city’s shopping arcade, “Sakura-shinmachi” shopping street in Setagaya Ward trying to enliven its community.
In March, 2013, a bronze statue of Ozora Tsubasa, the main character from the manga “Captain Tsubasa”, was placed in Yotsugi-tsubasa park in Katsushika Ward, Tokyo. All statues are made of Takaoka-Imono. By collaborating with popular manga characters in the form of bronze statues, Takaoka Imono has made itself known to many around the country, which led to boosting the sale of its products as well.

As for plateware, the gorgeous looks of cups and sauce-pouring containers using antibacterial tin make them popular as gifts for loved ones.

Nowadays many companies in Takaoka are shifting their production focus to the making of high-quality interior decoration. These combine modern tastes with the influence of Japanese design to create products you won’t find anywhere else.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts -


Takaoka dooki 高岡銅器 bronze work






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................................................................................ Yamagata 山形県  

. Yamagata imono 山形鋳物 ironware, cast iron, metal art - Yamagata Casting .


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. Join the MINGEI group on facebook ! .  



. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .

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2/18/2017

Noboribetsu Oni Demons

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. Oni 鬼 demon, ogre, monster - Introduction .
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Oni 登別の鬼 The Demons of Noboribetsu

quote
Noboribetsu in southwestern Hokkaido is the location of the Noboribetsu, Karurusu, kaminoboritbetsu hot springs, and has a rich variety of scenery including forests, lakes and marshes. It has been designated a part of Shikotsu-Toya National Park.
The Noboribetsu hot spring is one of Hokkaido's best-known hot springs, and is surrounded by a virgin forest 200 meters above sea level. It has 9 different kinds of water, containing minerals such as sulfur, salt, and iron. The quality of these minerals results in the spa being ranked among the world's most exceptional hot springs.

In the northeastern part of the hot spring grow many sorts of broad-leafed trees, including oaks, and a bamboo grass called 'kuma-zasa.' The area is called Noboribetsu Primeval Forest, and has been designated as a natural monument. To the east is Mt. Shihorei, from which you can view Lake Kuttara, with its clear water said to be the second most transparent in Japan.



The most impressive scene at the hot spring is the 地獄の谷 Jigoku Valley (hell valley), where yellowy gray volcanic gas seeps from the surface of the rocks. This makes the whole place smell strongly of sulfur, and gives it an image like that of hell. The valley is a 450-meter-diameter mouth of a volcano, which produces 3,000 liters of hot water per minute.
source : jnto.go.jp/eng/regional/hokkaido

登別の湯を守る湯鬼神(ゆきじん)。登別温泉の様々なイベントに現われ人々の幸せを願い厄払いをしてくれます。 夏の間だけ繰り広げられる「地獄の谷の鬼花火」では、赤鬼と青鬼が地獄谷を舞台に道内では珍しい手筒花火を打ち上げ、太鼓の音色とともに舞い踊ります。

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- quote -
Meet the Demons (Oni) of Hell Valley in Noboribetsu Onsen
Every year in summer, you can experience the fable of Hell Valley (Jigokudani) unfold before your eyes.


----- JR Noboribetsu Station Welcome Demon 登別駅前 歓迎鬼像

The Demon’s Fireworks (鬼花火 Onihanabi) burst into life at 8:30pm on Thursdays and Fridays from June 1 through to August 7 at the Hell Valley Observatory. The Yukijin (the demons who protect the hot springs in Noboribetsu) carry large burning torches in the shape of kanabo clubs shooting fireworks like volcanic eruptions along the path into Hell Valley, lighting up the night.
However,
before you enjoy this exciting event, you should first meet the many legendary inhabitants of Hell Valley to help you fully appreciate the festivities.
There are 11 demon spots in Noboribetsu and each of them is unique.

Yukijin 湯鬼神 Demon Guardian of the Hot Springs
The Yukijin are the stars of the show at the Onihanabi fireworks festival. At this time of the year they show up at festivals and events to drive away evil spirits and bring happiness to people.

You’ll see them carrying two symbolic weapons for these dual roles: a sword to protect people from evil spirits, and kagura bells to alert everyone of their arrival as they walk through the streets and drive away bad luck. Away from the festival, most of the demons you encounter carry a large spiked club called a kanabo – making the strong even stronger – and not someone you’d like to meet on a dark night.


----- Romance Demon 恋愛成就




Demon of Business Prosperity シンボル鬼 商売繁盛鬼像
Noboribetsu-Higashi Interchange Demon 登別東高速IC前
Parent and Child Demons 歓迎親子鬼像
Praying Demon Shrine (Onizo Nembutsu) 鬼祠 -念佛鬼像
Sengen Park Demon 泉源公園の鬼っこ
Study Demon シンボル鬼 合格祈願
Yukake Hot Water Demon 湯かけ鬼蔵
- - - - - King Enma Shrine - King of Hell 閻魔堂


If you want to learn more about things to see and do in Noboribetsu Onsen, take a look at the Noboribetsu Tourist Onsen homepage.
- source : takimotokan.co.jp/english/news -

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Noboribetsu Jigoku Festival 登別地獄祭り 




Noboribetsu Onsen Festival 登別地獄祭り



- quote -
The festival is for appreciating the powerful water and various quality of “hot water,” and wishing for future prosperity and sound health. Various events are held, such as splashing buckets of hot water and mochi rice cake pounding dance for children.
- source : nihon-kankou.or.jp -


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CLICK for more photos wasabi from Noboribetsu
登別のわさび

This has started about 100 years ago, when the local doctor found a spring with very good and plentiful fresh water. He introduced the wasabi fields and used the wasabi as a kind of medicine for the villagers, to prevent food poisoning in the hot summer days. Now in the 4th generation, they keep these fields in good order and provide wasabi dishes of all kinds.

. Food from Hokkaido 北海道 .

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. Reference .

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- - - - - Haiku and Senryu - - - - -

雪山に噴く湯ゆたかに登別
yukiyama ni fuku yu yutaka ni Noboribetsu

in the snow mountains
hot water sprouts plentiful -
Noboribetsu


清水寥人 Shimizu Ryojin (1920 - 1994)
Famous novelist



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2/13/2017

tsuiki hammered metal ware

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. Niigata Folk Art - 新潟県 - Introduction .
. imono 鋳物 ironware, cast iron, metal art .
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tsuiki 鎚起, tsuikin 鎚金 hammered metal ware, metalware

Tsuiki means shaping metal by hand hammering。


tankin 鍛金 hammering 
The term tankin is used in Japan today to refer to a range of different techniques that broadly divide into tanzo, tsuiki, shibori and bankin.

Tanzo (forging) is the technique used for iron. The other techniques are used for gold, silver, copper and alloys. When a solid mass of metal is hammered out, the technique is known as tsuiki.
Shibori and bankin are techniques used on sheet metal that has been prepared in advance by mechanical means.

Bankin involves the cutting and bending of sheet metal, whereas shibori, which allows the creation of freely conceived forms, involves hammering. Most metals harden when they are hammered and become soft and pliable when they are heated and slowly cooled, a process known as annealing (yakinamashi). These properties are made use of in all tankin techniques except bankin.
- source - nihon-kogeikai.com - 日本工芸会 -

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- quote -
tankin 緞金 beating gold
Also called tanzoo 緞造, uchimono 打物, tsuikin 鎚金 and kaji 鍛冶.
A basic metalwork technique for hammering out a metal lump with a metal or wooden hammer, beating a metal sheet thin from the front and back, or pressing metal to give it form. Used since the Japanese first started to use metals in the Yayoi period, and employed at first for gold, silver and copper, then for bronze, nickel, brass, iron and tin.
Tankin techniques are divided into categories of tsuikin, bankin 板金 and oshidashi 押出.
Tsuikin (hammer relief) is beating sheet metal from the front and back to give three dimensional form or relief patterns.
In the Kofun period it was used on long swords and harnesses; it is common on Buddhist altar fittings since the Nara period; in the Muromachi period it is seen on fittings of helmets and armor; and in the Meiji period Yamada Sobi 山田宗美 utilized it for sculpture.
Bankin (sheet metal process) is the folding and soldering of metal sheets to create three-dimensional forms such as reliquaries, sutra boxes and hanging lanterns.
Oshidashi (extrusion) uses a thin metal sheet on a template and is beaten from the top to transfer the shape; it can be utilized for mass production. In the Nara period, it was used widely for *oshidashibutsu 押出仏 (extruded Buddhist image) and the *sentaibutsu 千体仏 (thousand Buddhist images) inside the Tamamushi shrine *Tamamushi no zushi 玉虫厨子 in Houryuuji 法隆寺.
It requires a kanatoko 鉄床 (anvil), *kanazuchi 鉄鎚 (iron hammer), *kizuchi 木槌 (a mallet), ategane 当金 (dolly), *tagane 鏨 (graver) and yasuri 鑢 (file) to make *butsuzou 仏像 (Buddhist image), butsugu 仏具 (altar fittings), dora 銅鑼 (gongs), bugu 武具 (armory), *kooro 香炉 (an incense burner), pots, dishes and kettles.
- source : JAANUS -

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tankin no iroha 緞金のいろは the basics of beating metal
- reference source : akaitaro.com/tankin-

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- ABC - List of tsuiki from the Prefectures

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................................................................................ Niigata 新潟 燕市  

Tsubame Tsuiki Dooki 燕鎚起銅器 Tsuiki Doki : hammered metal ware from Tsubame town
Reference mentions bronze, tin or copper as the main material used.



- quote -
Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware
- - - - - Description
Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware are metalwork made in an area around Tsubame City, Niigata Prefecture. As traditional craftwork originating in the mid-Edo Period, Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware have been produced in the form of kettles, and the like, by using copper extracted from the region’s Mt. Yahiko.
Tsuiki means shaping metal by hand hammering, and in this case one piece of malleable copper plate will be extended using a range of traditional skills and techniques. Characteristics of Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware include a shiny appearance created by tsuiki performed by a master artisan, and with time the texture of copper increases in attractiveness with long-term use and proper care. In addition to kettles, other beautiful Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware every day articles include vases, water pitchers, teapots, and the like. And apart from looking so fine, tea poured from a copper teapot is said to have a milder taste due to the action of metal ions. Each product is made by several hundred thousand hammer blows making the outer side so smooth it looks like china.
Tsubame Tuiki Coppereware was designated as a traditional craft by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry in 1981.
- - - - - HISTORY
Tsubame City, Niigata Prefecture, famous for its production of metalwork, has a history starting from the making of Japanese nails in around the early Edo Period. Tsubame Tsuiki Doki originates with artisans from Sendai visiting Tsubame City sometime in the mid-Edo Period and introducing the copperware techniques of tsuiki; the hammering techniques of that time have been handed down for well over 200 years. Tsubame City is currently the only area producing tsuiki copperware in the country. The main reason for the development of the production of tsuiki copperware in the region is the high-grade copper ore extracted from neighboring Mt. Yahiko. Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware over time developed techniques beyond the simple making of kettles and in the Meiji Period adopted metal carving techniques suited for more artistic crafts. Copperware, such as teapots, vases, and art work, which become more attractive over a long period of time has been loved for many years, and has become indispensable in daily life.
A vase of Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware was even dedicated to the Emperor Meiji in 1894.
- - - - - PROCESS
1. Hammering
The production processes of hammered copperware vary depending on the shape of article to be made. The following explanation describes the making of the popular kettle. There are four basic processes: copper plate cutting, plate shaping, decorative work, and finishing. In the first process, a copper plate is cut to size. Hammering is then performed on a side surface part. The copper plate is placed on a wooden table exclusively used for this process, and the side surface part is hammered with a wooden hammer. Varying indentations on the wooden table are important for creating different sections of the kettle, such as a side surface or the spout. The strength and angle of hammering need to be considered depending on the rigidity and malleability of the copper plate. This process requires a very high level of skill, and is a true test of the artisan’s abilities.
2. Uchishibori (Thinning)
Next, the copper plate is hammered and made thinner. The copper plate is placed on a metal tool called a torikuchi (L shaped stake). This tool, which is also called an ategane (stake), is used for a variety of techniques and purposes depending on the item being made, and when used is inserted in an agariban (wooden table) made from Japanese zelkova. The copper plate needs to be hammered many times in order to make a kettle spout; a task requiring much perseverance and concentration.



3. Annealing
Continuously hammered copper plate becomes gradually harder, and needs to be temporarily softened in a furnace at around 650°C. Hammering and heating are repeated many times until completion.
4. Shaping
Any irregularities and deformation on the body are adjusted and balanced to give a beautiful shape. The surface becomes shinier as it is repeatedly hammered.
5. Metal carving
After the product is shaped, the surface is processed. A detailed design is drawn, engraved, and carved with a tool called a tagane (cold chisel). Inlaying is sometimes carried out to overlay the product with gold and silver decoration. Metal carving adds brightness and elegance to the plain copper color of the kettle.
6. Coloring and Finishing
Finally, to give a different texture to the metal surface, the kettle is dipped into a solution and the color changed. There are two kinds of coloring methods. In the black color-based method, the kettle is tinned and fired at 800°C, and then hammered. For coloring, the product is then boiled in the liquid obtained by mixing green rust and copper sulfate, which gives an attractive dark purple color called kinko. In the red color-based method, the product is boiled for several hours longer in the liquid until the creation of a brown color called sentoku. Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware articles made by repeated hammering of a single piece of copper plate have a unique beauty seen in no other metal work.
The copperware we see today is a testimony to the traditional techniques of tsuiki lying at the heart of Tsubame Tsuiki Coppereware and faithfully handed down through generations of skilled artisans.
- - - - - Tsubame Industrial Materials Museum
- source : kogeijapan.com/locale -

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Hand Hammered Copper Vase by Gyokusendo Corp
- source : themodernvault.com/product -



CLICK for more of Gyokusendo metal art work !

- HP of Gyokusendo 無形文化財 鎚起銅器 - 200 Years Gyokusendo 玉川堂
- reference source : gyokusendo.com-

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- quote -
Tsubame-tsuiki Bronze Ware
Tsubame-tsuiki bronze ware is a traditional artifact that is created using an extremely complex forging technique, which can be summarized as the hammering of a plate of bronze in a wide variety of ways. This will turn it into the shapes of various accessories such as kettles, flower vases and plateware.

While it might seem a great wonder that one plate of metal can be turned into the shape of an almost round object, this is what makes a Tsubame-tsuiki bronze ware artisan a master of his craft. On the inner side of a bronze plate, one connects an iron stick called “Toriguchi” whose pointed end can come in hundred different kinds of shapes. When the plate is beaten from the outside with a hammer (of which there are hundred types as well), it eventually changes into a 3-dimensional shape. The vibration that is given to the bronze plate creates some unique effects, depending on the shapes of “Toriguchi” and hammers and how the plate is beaten; It can then be stretched or even shrunk. This is the hardest part of its production process, and it would take 20 to 30 years for one artisan to be able to handle the entire process on his/her own.

The metal-processing industry in Tsubame city, Niigata prefecture originated from the making of Japanese nails as a side business for farmers in the beginning of the 17th century. With the convenience of the near Yahiko mountain being a copper mine, many variety of products connected fine skills and creativity came to prominence. These included bronze ware, pipe, file, and yatate (portable writing utensils with a brush and an ink bottle).

During the 18th century, a technique called “Tsuiki” was brought by artisans from the area which covers the current Sendai in Miyagi Prefecture. It enables one to make kettles, flower vases or plates without any joint lines by beating out one bronze plate repeatedly. This was the start of Tsubame-tsuki bronze ware, leading to what has now become a world-famous craft. It has the practicality and artistry of traditional craftwork created by highly-skilled artisans and its luster more comes out after repeated use.

In addition to traditional everyday items, Tsubame-tsuiki bronze ware is now available in the form of new product designs which have never been seen before, such as Western plates or wine coolers, receiving high acclaim in and out of the country. It has been used as plateware, for instance, in a world-famous French restaurant and has been featured in collaborations with well-known brands’ new products, which has served the purpose of spreading traditional Japanese craftwork out to the rest of the world.
- - - - - Tsubame Local Industry Promotion Center
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts -



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12/26/2016

kosho Daruma Chiba

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kosho Daruma 古書だるま Daruma from old books

They are made by 松本節太郎 Matsumoto Setsutaro, who makes all kinds of dolls from local clay and paper, 下総玩具 Shimofusa gangu toys.
He has produced more than 1500 dolls.
Before settling down at his shop, 根戸工房 he roamed the area as a kind of homeless wanderer.
He used to pack his rucksack full of dolls, travel to downtown Tokyo and sit by the roadside or at a temple ground during a festival to sell them.
He made kubi ningyoo 首人形 head dolls and kashiwa hariko 柏張り子 papermachee dolls in the Kashiwa style.

Look at this page for 30 photos of his work:
source : kashiwa-museum.com/exhibition

松本節太郎 Matsumoto Setsutaro (1903 - 2004)

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. Reference - "古書だるま" .

. gangu 玩具 伝説, omochcha おもちゃ  toy, toys and legends .
- Introduction -

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12/12/2016

Yamagata city mingei

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. Yamagata Folk Art - 山形県  - Introduction .
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Yamagata Mingei 山形市民芸 Folk art from Yamagata city



quote
Yamagata (山形市 Yamagata-shi) is the capital city of Yamagata Prefecture located in the Tōhoku region of northern Japan.
The Mogami River passes through the city, which includes Mount Zaō within its borders. ...
The area of present-day Yamagata was part of Dewa Province. During the Edo period, it was the center of Yamagata Domain under the Tokugawa shogunate. The modern city of Yamagata was founded on April 1, 1889 as the capital of Yamagata Prefecture. The city attained Special city status on April 1, 2001.
source : More in the Wikipedia

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. butsudan, Yamagata Butsudan 山形仏壇 Buddhist Family Altar .

. hariko, Yamagata hariko 山形張り子 papermachee dolls .
. . . . . including Shibue ningyoo 渋江人形 Shibue dolls
. . . . . tako ni neko 蛸に猫 octopus cuddeling a manekineko cat

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dantsu 山形緞通 Yamagata Dantsu carpets
They are made with a special maschine which can move along the details of a painted motive and create very real "pictures".
They are made from sheep's wool and feel very warm to the touch.


source : sg.emb-japan.go.jp/JCC/Yamagata

Yamagata Prefecture possesses the highest level of technology in the carpet making industry.
These exhibits have been made by the same exclusive manufacturer of carpets for The Imperial Palace, Fukiage Omiya Palace, State Guest House, Vatican Palaces and Kabukiza Theatre.

- reference : yamagata carpet -

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Hirashimizu-yaki 平清水焼 Hirashimizu pottery

. Hirashimizu - Vase with Daruma san .

Hirashimizu, the "Pottery Village, to the south of Yamagata city is a renowned pottery producing area.
It started with 小野藤次平 Ono Fujitsugitaira (Onofuji Jihei) around 1810, who settled here, coming from Hitachi province.
Around 1830, 安倍覚左エ門 Abe Satoshihidariemon (Abe Kakuza Doraemon) from the Soma clan settled here.



It is said that at its peak there were some 20 producers in the area. This number has now dwindled to six which are enjoying the recent boom in ceramics. The peach Celadon style whereby the iron particles protrude through the celadon glaze giving the pottery a peach-skin effect is particularly well known. Pottery lessons and tours of the buildings where the potters sit at their wheels can be arranged by the Shichiemon, Bun'emon and Heikichi potters.


Hirashimizu Daruma

Hirashimizu ningyoo 平清水人形 Hirashimizu clay dolls



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imono 山形鋳物 Yamagata ironware, cast iron, metal art


「山形鋳物」950年の歴史 - 950 years of history
source : pref.yamagata.jp/ou/shokokanko


- quote -
- Yamagata Ironware: matured over 900 years

- Cutlery and Implements
Inheriting the tradition of swordsmiths, the challenge for new craftwork for Yamagata swordsmith.
It is said that around 650 years ago, the founder for Mogami family, Kaneyori Shiba (1315-1379) moved to Yamagata. He took his own smiths with him. Swords and farm equipment were produced according to times. Currently, scissors, knife and sickle are produced. The amount of production for cutlery and implements is highest in Tohoku area.
“Kaji-shou“ is the brand for smith groups trying to create new design.
They are careful in selecting the technique(free forging) and materials (Blue Paper steel). They focus on modern design, sharpness and easy use.

- - - - - details
- source : www.yamagata-export.jp



- quote -
Yamagata Casting
In Yamagata city, Yamagata prefecture, there are two towns with peculiar names – Do machi and Imono (cast metal) machi. The names of these places are derived from the local specialty Yamagata Imono.



The origin of Yamagata Imono dates back to the Heian era (from 794 to 1185 or around 1192). When Minamoto no Yoriyoshi, a famous warlord during the Heian era, visited the Tohoku region to suppress a revolt (called the Battle of Zenkunen-no-eki), the imono artisans who had been brought along found that the sand in the Mamigasaki river running through Yamagata city and the soil around the Chitose park were perfect for imono. Some of them stayed in the area and began producing imono, which is said to be the beginning of Yamagata Imono. Later on, imono was presented as a tribute when Yamagata castle was built.

During the Edo era (1603 – 1868) when the life of common folk became more stable and different crafts began blooming in many parts of the country, a domain lord named Mogami Yoshiaki reorganized the castle town, gathered up imono artisans and established a town dedicated to imono, the current Do machi. It was around this time that foot-operated fans were brought in and the production of large imono items such as temple bells and garden lanterns started. As many people visited the Dewa-sanzan mountain, Yamagata Imono turned into souvenirs such as Buddhist altar articles and everyday products which rapidly spread the name nationwide and expanded its application from traditional craftworks to the production of sewing machines and automobile components. In 1974, part of the production in Do machi moved to the Yamagata Imono industrial complex, as more space was needed, and Imono machi was thus established. This is the history behind the unique names of these towns.

Yamagata Imono, which evolved from being the products of imono artisans serving warlords to everyday items in Japan, comes in a variety of forms, from large items such as bells, garden lanterns and machine components to more familiar ones like knives and frying pans. Yet every single product represents the soul of Yamagata Imono, with their accurate arrangement, smooth surface, strength and beauty.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts -


. tetsubin 鉄瓶 iron kettles - Introduction .

. imono 鋳物 ironware, cast iron, metal art .
- Introduction -


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. Kokeshi 山形こけし Yamagata Kokesh wooden dolls .

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. sashimono, Yamagata Sashimono 山形指物 cabinetry .

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kasen-dako 花泉凧 Kasen Kite
- (not : hanaizumidako) -


varieties:
こま凧(虎) komadako tiger - こま凧(福助) komadaku Fukusuke  - くらげ凧(うさぎ) kuragedako usagi  - 角凧(蛇王丸)kakudako

This type of kite was first produced by 阿部華泉(あべかせん) Abe Kasen around 1840 in the suburb of 八日町 Yokamachi in Yamagata town.
In the local dialect they are called obata 小旗 "small flags".
The Abe family is now in the fourth generation making these kites, the present Abe san lives in 天童市 Tendo.
- reference source : pref.yamagata.jp/ou/shokokanko/110010 -

There is a legend about おせんと蛇王丸 O-Sen and ?Hebiomaru.

. tako 凧 Kites of Japan - Introduction .

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quote (seems a google translate site)

Yamagata Shikki Lacquerware (Yamagata City) 山形漆器(山形市)
Lacquerware making using a special product of Yamagata
its history from more than 300 years ago
Yamagata that lacquerware have been made from more than 300 years ago. Work of lacquerware making is, plate products wooden base positions, paint jobs, decorative, performed in the sale and division of labor, in the Taisho period referred to as the dozens of lacquerware was in the artisan town. The technique basis, without leaving a brush uneven, but show the lacquer of the gloss "flower painting" was developed, currently, the only long-established to continue the lacquerware making in Yamagata "Honke Nagato (Nagato) in shop", its own "KennoSuke of (Gon'no Yosuke) we are coating".
Traditional coating technology and
has combined modern performance "assistant coating Noriyuki authority"
Kenno Jonuri is a technique that Yamaguchi Kenno assistant's predecessor and the current 13 generations that hope revival of Yamagata lacquerware devised while repeating the trial, subjected to a hand-carved of safflower pattern on the wooden base, from the base coat in this lacquer carried out until the top coat, further sow the red iron oxide pigment "Shu蒔(main winding) will finish on top of the Law". Jonuri Noriyuki Kwon This unique technique has been popular as a tractable folk tone lacquerware durable.

- TBA -
Yamagata Tategu (furnishings) (Yamagata City) 山形建具(山形市)
Kiri-bako (box made from paulownia) (Yamagata City)  桐箱(山形市)
Tokogei (Rattan Crafts) (Yamagata City) 籐工芸(山形市)
Kirihata-no-Mokkohin (Wooden Works made in the Kirihata district)切畑の木工品(臼)
Yamagata Nokogiri (Saws) (Yamagata City) 山形鋸(山形市)
Yamagata hitting cutlery (Yamagata) 山形打刃物(山形市)
Wa-gasa, wagasa (Japanese traditional umbrella)(Yamagata City) 和傘(山形市)
? Kirigami (paulownia paper) (Yamagata City) ?
- source : . . pref.yamagata.jp/ou/shokokanko


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. Reference ー 山形市 民芸品
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. gangu 玩具 伝説, omochcha おもちゃ  toy, toys and legends .
- Introduction -


. Odawara imono 小田原 鋳物 Odawara casting . - Kanagawa

. imono 鋳物 ironware, cast iron, metal art .
- Introduction -

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. Join the MINGEI group on facebook ! .  



. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples .


. Tohoku after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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