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4/26/2018

shikki laquerware Lack

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shikki 漆器 laquerware, laquer ware - Lackarbeiten

. urushi ウルシ/ 漆 laquer .
Poison oak. laquer tree, Toxicodendron vernicifluum
- Introduction -



. Aizu urushi, Aizu nuri  会津漆 Aizu lacquerware .

. Echizen shikki 越前漆器 Echizen lacquerware .

. Edo shikki 江戸漆器 Edo lacquerware / Tokyo .

. Kamakurabori 鎌倉彫り Kamakura laquerware .

. Kanazawa shikki 金沢漆器 Kanazawa lacquerware .

. Kawatsura shikki 川連漆器 Kawatsura lacquerware .

. Kishuu urushi 紀州漆 Kishu laquerware .

. Negoro nuri 根来塗 Negoro laquerware .

. Rantai shikki 籃胎漆器 Rantai laquerware .

. Shosha nuri 書写塗 Shosha laquerware - Hyogo .

. Takaoka shikki 高岡漆器 Takaoka lacquerware .

. Tsugaru nuri 津軽漆 Tsugaru laquerware .

. Wajima nuri 輪島塗 Wajima laquerware .

. Wakasa shikki 若狭漆器 Wakasa laquerware .

Kiso 木曽漆器(長野県)
Kyoto 京漆器(京都府)
Naruko 鳴子漆器(宮城県)
Ryukyu 琉球漆器(沖縄県)
Takamatsu 高松漆器(香川県)
Yamanaka 山中漆器(石川県)

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. maki-e, makie 蒔絵 lacquer pictures .

. koogei, kôgei 工藝 / 工芸 Kogei, industrial art .



urushi no hi 漆の日 "Lacquer Day" - November 13

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Hida Takayama 飛騨高山 春慶塗 Shunkei nuri laquerware



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At the heart of Takayama, a small museum presents this marvel of craftsmanship of the Hida region: the shunkei urushi. The red-brown color of the utensils displayed behind the glass walls guarantees their success: in Takayama, the lacquer gets better with age and the color lightens and gets brighter.
It was in the seventeenth century that the artisans of the region created a varnish that took away the usual problem of lacquers, namely a long exposure to light made ​​them lose their luster. These processes are explained in the museum, where many reference panels and objects detail the transformation process.
The thousand objects dating from the Edo period to the present day show the evolution of the lacquer over the centuries, from tiny utensils to noble furniture. The relaxed and peaceful atmosphere of the establishment makes it possible to fully appreciate the coppery hues of these true works of art. The tour is short but educational, constituting a perfect little visit to break up the day. In the annex of the museum is a store where you can splash out on charming little boxes, cups and other items.
Caution, however, prices match the level of expertise!
- reference source : -


- CLICK for more beautiful samples !

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Jooboji nuri 浄法寺塗 Joboji nuri laquer ware
Iwate



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Joboji Nuri takes its name from the Joboji family which ruled the northern part of Iwate Prefecture during the middle ages, and it is also the name of the area.
According to local legend, monks were dispatched there from the head temple, when a famous high priest called Gyoki built Tendaiji temple in the area during the Nara period (710-794). Lacquer ware techniques were apparently introduced at the time, so that the monks would be able to make their own tableware.
A product important to the ruling Nambu clan during the Edo period (1600-1868), the making of Joboji-Nuri spread from around Tendaiji temple to the adjoining area now known as 安代町 Ajiro-cho and became known as 御山御器(おやまごき Oyama-goki ware. This larger area became the foundation of the present production.
Items of lacquer ware
which have been used since ancient times such as soup bowls, rice bowls and lipped bowls are still being made. Some of the traditional bowls are patterned but most of them are finished in plain vermilion, black or a clear lacquer to show off the wood and have a sophisticated mat finish. But perhaps the biggest feature of Joboji ware is its everlasting sense of quality stemming from a use of quality materials. Bowls for soup or rice, trays, flower vases are the main products today.
- reference source : Iwate Laquer Ware cooperative association -


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Joboji Museum of History and Folklore

Joboji Museum of History and Folklore at the entrance of Tendaiji Temple.
Many cultural property specified documentation by the country and city are on display, such as: articles about Tendaiji, stoneware and earthenware and other tools from the district. In addition it is possible to learn about the traditional job of lacquer scraper and how Japanese lacquer is integrated in to the everyday life of the people here at Joboji Temple, which has the largest production of lacquer in the country. There are also tools such as planes used by craftsmen, and many articles and documents on lacquer. Learn why the lacquerware made by the monks of Tendaiji are referred to as “Oyama-goki”, and how it is rooted in the lives of ordinary people.
Many lacquerwares that are said to be the roots of “Joboji Coating” speak volume about the history of this place and its lacquerwares. Visit the museum before Joboji to better understand the history and the relation of Joboji Coating and Tendaiji Temple.
- - 35 Oyamakubo Joboji-machi Ninohe
- reference source : ninohe-kanko.com/english...-

- further reference Joboji -

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Niigata 新潟

Murakami kibori tsuishu 村上木彫堆朱 Murakami carved lacquerware



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Murakami Kibori Tsuishu lacquerware is produced in the area around Murakami City, in Niigata Prefecture.
The Murakami region, which was formerly the Murakami Domain, has been famous for its production of natural lacquer since the Heian Period. It was on the streets of this castle town that the beautiful craft involving elaborate engraving and durable, colourful lacquer finishing blossomed. 剔紅 Tekko, the Chinese form of tsuishu which the Murakami Kibori Tsuishu was based on, involved engraving designs on thick layers of lacquer. In Murakami Kibori Tsuishu, however, engraving is done directly on the wood base before applying the lacquer coating, thereby reducing the amount of lacquer required in addition to enabling artists to create dynamic engravings and detailed patterns. The articles are also extremely durable as they are coated several times with a viscous type of lacquer in order to prevent lacquer from flowing into the grooves. Part of the production process includes dulling, which results in a matte finish that can be likened to light from a hazy moon, but the articles grow in gentle luster the more they are used.
The characteristics of Murakami Kibori Tsuishu are its durability against daily use, and the way it gains a deep luster over the years it is used. This is not an art craft that is simply meant to be displayed and admired; the true value of Murakami Kibori Tsuishu can only be brought out through daily use.
- History
Murakami Kibori Tsuishu is said to have originated approximately 600 years ago in the Muromachi Period, by a lacquer craftsman who came to Murakami from Kyoto to aid in the construction of a temple. The lords of the Domain actively promoted the techniques during the Edo Period, and a lacquer magistrate was established in the latter half of the 17th century, further boosting the cultivation of lacquer trees.
The tsuishu and 堆黒 tsuikoku that we see today started to be produced in the 18th century. In the 19th century, the Murakami samurai warriors who worked in Edo began to pick up lacquering and lacquer carving techniques as a hobby, and contributed to the development of the industry when they brought these techniques home with them.
The late Edo Period saw the birth a master craftsman, 有磯周斎 Shusai ARIISO (1809 – 1879). Born as the second son of temple carpenter 稲垣八郎兵衛 Hachirobe INAGAKI, he was learning the family business under his father but his passion was sculpting. He went on to study sculpting in Edo along with lacquer arts, and acquired various techniques such as tsuishu and tsuikoku. By adding sketches of Chinese designs and incorporating kamakura-bori techniques to improve quality, he laid the foundations of the Murakami Kibori Tsuishu that we see today.
- General Production Process
- source : kogeijapan.com/locale/en... -

Murakami Lacquerware – A Brief History
- source : Alex Ehrenreich 2017 -

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urushi matsuri 漆まつり laquer festival



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紀州漆器まつり Kishu Lacquer festival
Wooden products entirely covered with lacquer are the most common kind one sees on the market. However, Kishu lacquer leaves several spots unvarnished.
Around the 14th to 16th century, local woodworkers began making rice bowls coated with black lacquer. During this time, Buddhist monks in Negoroji temple had also been making their own lacquered objects, such as chopsticks, trays, bowls, and others that were used for prayers and mantras. They used black lacquer as the first coat, and added red lacquer on top. Since their craftsmanship was not up to par, some parts of the finished objects often had missing spots. But it turned out that people actually liked this unintended look! This particular style of coating was thus designated as Negoro lacquer.
In 1590,
the famed warlord Hideyoshi Toyotomi, who had been ruling over Japan, invaded Negoro. The monks managed to escape, and began settling in Kainan city, the west of Negoro. Thereafter, Negoro lacquer began flourishing around the 17th century under the support of the regional Kishu lordship. Later in the 19th century, a method was introduced of decorating a lacquered surface by painting pictures and applying gold powders. These objects were traded in Nagasaki and Kobe and continued to evolve throughout the 20th century. In 1978, Kishu Lacquer was recognized as one of the Traditional Handcrafts of Japan.
Kishu Lacquer
had amateurish appearances during its beginnings. However, it has changed over the centuries. Nowadays, it has a great variety of styles and designs. Kuroe in Kainan city is the center of Kishu Lacquer production, with a tourist information center, a museum and others promoting the art form. Many tourists including large groups come to the city every year.
The Kishu Lacquer Festival held in November each year attracts 50,000-70,000 tourists over a period of two days. This is the largest scale event of this kind in West Japan, and a great opportunity to see a wonderful array of Kishu Lacquer wares on display.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp... -


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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


................................................................................ Miyazaki 宮崎県  

児湯郡 西米良村

ryuu 龍 dragon
漆取りの兄弟がいた。兄は上質の漆を取っては竹筒に入れて淵に沈めていた。弟もその漆を見つけて売るようになったので、弟を脅すため、兄は木彫りの龍を買ってきて淵に沈めた。その龍は本物の龍になってしまい、漆は取れなくなった。兄弟は仲直りをした。


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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
96 漆 (01)
68 漆間元三 Uruma Ganzan

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