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11/10/2011

Tanuki Badger Racoon Dog

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Tanuki 狸 Badger, Racoon Dog
- Introduction -


. tanuki 狸 mujina 狢 - badger legends from Japan .




Five Buddhas and one Tanuki in my Garden

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The Japanese Tanuki racoon dog,
Nyctereutes procyonoides, also called badger, is still a familiar sight in rural neighbourhoods.

Next to the fox the Tanuki is seen as a crafty animal with magical powers,
but unlike the fearful fox it is quite humorous in its tricks.




. Tanuki and Daruma .
... and the Tanuki Scrotum, kintama 金玉



Shigaraki Pottery 信楽焼

Nowadays, you can see a Tanuki figure standing outside restaurants and bars beckoning customers to come inside. Here he stands upright, usually with a vest, a hat, and carrying a bottle of liquor. He is believed to travel from one pub to the next in search of more liquor and good company.

. Tanuki and Sake Legends 狸とお酒 .



from Fudo Temple at the Tanuki Valley Mountain
狸谷山不動院 Tanukidaniyama
This temple in Kyoto has many more amulets. It is well known for Miyamoto Musashi practising ascetics under a waterfall.

. Tanukidani Fudo-In Temple .



Tanuki figures are sold everywhere, for your garden, as home decoration or little amulets on a string.

. Tanuki in the WIKIPEDIA !


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Tanuki Osho Clay Bell たぬき和尚



. otogibanashi dorei おとぎ話の土鈴
clay bells with motives of legends .



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- ABC - List of Tanuki from the Prefectures

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. . . . . . . . . . Ehime

from Kikuma town 菊間


Kizaemon and Kojooro the Tanuki prostitute
喜左衛門と小女郎狸

(komero 小女郎)

This Tanuki is the object of verneration at the shrine Kusunoki Jinja 楠木神社
Kojooro Daimyoojin 小女郎大明神.

Once there were three tanuki siblings from the Iyo Tanuki Family 伊予狸族 venerated in the region of Iyo.

Nyuugawa 壬生川の喜左衛門狸 Kizaemon from river Nyugawa
Yashima no hage Tanuki 八島の禿狸 (later famous near Takamatsu)
and
Kojooro 小女郎狸

Kojooro Tanuki had been kept and fed by the head priest of the shrine Ichinomiya 一宮神社, because she was quite intelligent and kind.
But one day she stole some ears of the first rice. The priest scolded her and banned her from her nest near the big camphor tree (kusunoki).

For a long time she erred in the large forest around the shrine and finally reached the beach. She found a fisher boat ready to leave for Osaka. So one changed her figure into that of the priest of the temple Jigenji 慈眼寺 and sat in the boat.

This was a day when they fished quite a lot of the local speciality, the sea bream (tai 鯛). Oh, and this was her favorite food, but she resisted her desires, closed her eyes firmly and prayed to Amida Buddha, or rather the Bosatsu of the Sea Bream
Namu Taisan Bosatsu 南無鯛散菩薩.

At her feet the delicious-looking fish flapped here and there, so she became more and more hungry and could hardly subpress her lust for a fish meal.

"Oh well, just one will not break my Buddhist vows" ... she encouraged herself, sat closer to the fresh fish and slipped one under her Buddhist robe.
When she secretly tried to eat the fish, the fishermen found her out and scolded her:
"You stinkin' old priest! You thief!"

They begun hitting the priest-tanuki with a large oar, and in fear she lost her human figure, showed her long tail and hopped around franticaly in the small boat. She almost drowned in the chase.
When the fishermen let go of her, she repented her former sins and promised to protect the fishermen from now on.

"When we reach Osaka, I will change into a metal tea kettle.
You can sell the kettle and take the money as pay for the fish I stole from you and ate!"


Thus she payed back her debt to the fishermen.
After she had kept her promise as a tea kettle, she changed into a beautiful courtesan and spent some time in the pleasure quarters of Osaka.

Later she returned to the forest of shrine Ichinomiya and became a protective deity for those who keep their vows and have a wish fulfilled.
shogan jooju 諸願成就

Her statue at the shrine


The Kusunoki shrine near the big tree was built in her honor.


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. . . . . . . . . . Kagawa




Jooganji no Hage Tanuki 浄願寺の禿狸
bald Tanuki from temple Jogan-Ji


Most Tanuki stories and legends are told in Shikoku, some say, because there are no foxes in Shikoku, since Kobo Daishi banned them from the island for doing tricks to the humans.
So in Shikoku the Tanuki serves as the trickster and joker.

Jogan-Ji is a temple in Takamatsu city.
The tanuki had been fed by an old couple and wanted to show his gratitude (ongaeshi).
So he transformed himself into a tea cattle and asked the old man to sell him for good money.
The man who bought this tea cattle made fire every day to cook his water ... and thus the tanuki became all bald. But soon it hurt too much, he gave up his disguise, ran away and came back to the old couple.
The old man took pity on him and gave him three mochi rice cakes to feast on.

The story of a tanuki changing into a tea cattle are told elsewhere too.



my teapot
suddenly grows fur -
tanuki legends


. . . . .


. Tasaburo Tanuki 太三郎狸 .
from temple Yashima-ji 屋島寺


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. . . . . . . . . . Kochi


Kankuro Tanuki 権九郎狸



He is one of the famous tanuki of Shikoku.
In the mountain region of Ushioyama 潮江山 in the south of Kochi.

One day a woman made a wish to have a child at the shrine where Kankuro was living.
She became pregnant soon and gave birth - but whow, her baby was a tanuki.
Or rather, it looked like a tanuki to all other people, but not to the happy parents.
But the child died soon afterwards. The procession of the funeral had to take refuge during a strong rainshower - and whow and behold, someone stole the coffin during that break.
The procession climbed to Mount Ushioyama anyway and found another new grave there.
Maybe Kankuro, the tanuki, had built this? they thought.
Now any time it rains in the region, people see spooky lights along the mountain slope and think it is the tanuki funeral procession with their lanterns 葬連火.

Kankuro used to steal into the ladies quarters of the nearby castle at night, paste some red paper into the eyes of the sleeping ladies and then shouted "Fire, fire".
He used to enjoy the hustle and bustle that followed when the surprized ladies woke up in a hurry and ran around to extinguish the fire.


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. . . . . . . . . . Kumamoto

Hikoichi koma (Hiko-Ichi) 彦一独楽 spinning top

. Hikoichi don from Kumamoto 熊本の彦一  .
and the tanuki legends


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. . . . . . . . . . Kyoto

tanuki from temple Kodai-Ji (Koodaiji) 高台寺の狸



These Kyoto pottery tanuki figures have been sold in the access road to the shrine. They are an amulet to prevent robbers from entering the home. Nowadays they are made from Shigaraki pottery.
In contrast to the "domesticated" form of Shigaraki with a bamboo hat on the back, a sake flask and passbook (kayoichoo 通い帳) they look a bit more on the wild, animal side. From behind the large bamboo hat their tail is showing just a bit.



. Koodaiji 高台寺 Temple Kodai-Ji . Kyoto


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source : Iandalf Shimamura, facebook

at Yasaka Jinja

. Yasaka Shrine 八坂神社 and the Gion Festival .

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. . . . . . . . . . Mie

shita dashi tanuki 舌出し狸 tanuki showing his tongue

another version is this :

. The O-Nyudo of Yokkaichi 四日市の大入道 .


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. . . . . . . . . . Shizuoka


tanukiguruma 狸車 tanuki with wheels

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. . . . . . . . . . Tokyo


Tamonji temple  多聞寺



tanuki no chokin tama 狸の貯金玉 piggy bank with badger
Tanuki and his wife, 狸夫婦




tanuki no dorei 狸土鈴 clay bell with badger 

During a pilgrimage to the seven gods of good luck (Shichi Fukujin 七福神巡り) people would go to this temple dedicated to Bishamonten during the New Year festivities.

Once upon a time, a homeless tanuki lived in the temple compound, because it was not frequented much and quite wild. The tanuki changed into a monster and played tricks on the people. So they build a big hill for the tanuki to live and appeased him thus.
The temple is also famous for its lovely landscape garden.

The piggybank is now an amulet to wish for more money and good business.
The temple is also called the "Tanuki Temple" 狸の寺.




. Bishamonten Tanuki ... Bishamon Tanuki 毘沙門狸 .

. . . . .

. Joofukuji 常福寺 Jofuku-ji Temple in Setagaya .
In the precincts there are porcelain 狸 Tanuki racoon dogs in all sizes,

. . . . .

Ueno Toshogu Shrine 上野東照宮

. Eiyoo Gongen 栄誉権現 Venerable Guard Deity .
Ema votive tablet with tanuki

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Yanagimori jinja shrine 柳森神社
千代田区神田須田町2-25 Chiyoda, Kanda


oyako tanuki 親子狸 parent and child badger
o-tanuki san おたぬきさん the honorable Tanuki

The parent is about 3,5 cm, the child only 2 cm.
Once a Tanuki badger family, who lived near the pond Otama-ga-ike お玉ヶ池, close to 東紺屋町 Eastern Konya-Cho.
The original story tells of a wooden sculpture which the 6th Shogun Tokugawa Ienobu 徳川家宣 (1662 - 1712) gave his retainer hatamoto of the 河原林家 Kawarabayashi clan. After the Meiji Restauration, the estate of the clan had to be removed, so the Tanuki statues were given to the shrine.
Praying here brings good luck in all kinds of contests 勝負事.

. Konyachō 神田紺屋町 Konya-Cho in Kanda, Edo .

This shrine in Kanda is dedicated to the Tanuki, the trickster of Japanese legend.



ta o nuku 他を抜く pull away from the crowd
as an amulet for a good career and good business and victory in all endeavors.
The ladies pray for a good wedding partner (enmusubi) to make a brilliant marriage (tama no koshi 玉の輿).
(see story below).


source : sanpokatagata.blogspot.com
Check this link for more photos of the shrine.


quote
Yanagimori Shrine
was built in the late 17th century by a woman named Keisho-in 桂昌院, the daughter of a lowly greengrocer. As a teenager she was 'scouted' by representatives of Edo castle to join the O-oku -- the harem of women who serviced the Shogun. While this might sound like a sad fate by modern standards, in feudal times a spot in the O-oku was akin to winning the lottery for a woman. No matter how humble your origins, you were treated like royalty in the O-oku, particularly if you caught the Shogun's fancy.
And Keisho-in not only caught his fancy but bore him a son -- a son that eventually became the Fifth Tokugawa Shogun, making her a powerful political figure in her own right. Not bad for a woman who had been sweeping the floor in a vegetable stand just a few decades earlier.

And this is precisely why O-Tanuki Sama Jinja remains popular even today among those looking for a little boost in their professional lives. The nickname comes from yet another mnemonic pun:

"tanuki" can also be read "ta-nuki,"
or pulling away from the crowd, a symbol of victory.

It helps that it is a charming sort of place, framed as always with a bright red Torii gate.

But in place of the usual komainu moondog statues that flank the gates at most shrines, there stands a pair of exquisitely sculpted stone tanuki -- with testicles of legendary scale, of course. Stepping through, the concrete of the sidewalk gives way to stepping-stones atop well-trod earth. A cherry tree shades the grounds within, flecked with uncommon yellow-tinted flowers. Here and there can be seen several more tanuki in pottery and stone. Mossy stone markers and stone lanterns list gracefully between ferns and other greenery of the sort you almost never see in the city.
source : tokyo/play, Hiroko Yoda

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Denpooin 伝法院 Denpoin, Denpo-In, Asakusa

Around 1872, there used to be spooks going around this area. Finally people thought it was a curse of the Ohashi family, who had been "temple samurai 寺侍" here and cut down all the bamboo thicket to make a garden. A Tanuki who had lived there cursed the area, so they build a sanctuary for it and venerated it as a protector deity 鎮護大神. Now the "Golden Tanuki" is an amulet to prevent all kinds of fire and disaster.



Established in 1777, Denpoin is the parent temple of Asakusa Senso-ji. It is also a place for monks to perform ascetic practices.
- reference -

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タヌキ Tanuki, キツネ」 kitsune, 弘法大師 Kobo Daishi
Legends from Ehime, Iyo and Shikoku
source : kotaro_mil


Tanuki mit 8 Merkmalen:

1) ein grosser Strohhut zum Schutz vor Wetter und Ärger
2) große Augen um alles warzunehmen und richtige Entscheidungen zu treffen
3) Tugend wird durch eine Sake-Flasche dargestellt
4) der große Schwanz steht für Beständigkeit und Kraft
5) übergroße Hoden für finanzielles Glück
6) ein Schuldschein-Buch suggeriert Vertrauen
7) der dicke Trommel-Bauch steht für dreiste und gefasste Entschlossenheit
8) ein freundliches Lächeln bringt nur Gutes


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. . . CLICK here for Photos !

. Reference .

source : asahi/narumi/clinic



Reference : 長泉寺の狸
Saitama, Temple Chozen-Ji (Choozenji)

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Tanuki Kokeshi wooden dolls タヌキ こけし












and many MORE
source : zenmaitarow



- ebay, 2015 -


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Mistranslations of Tanuki
Confused Naming Conventions

Neither the badger nor the racoon (raccoon) figure prominently in Chinese or Japanese folklore or artwork. Nonetheless, for decades, Western scholars have mistranslated Tanuki as "badger" or "racoon-dog." This is clearly wrong, but can be forgiven -- the Tanuki does, in fact, look badger-like, racoon-like, and fox-like.

The magical shape-shifting Tanuki is clearly a composite creature. The original evil parts come from old China and its fox lore (introduced to Japan between the 4th-7th centuries CE). The newer tamer parts, such as the big belly, belly drumming, and giant scrotum, can be traced to late Edo-era Japan (18th-19th centuries), while the commercialized benevolent parts (sake bottle, promissory note, straw hat) emerged in Japanese artwork around the beginning of the 20th century.

Fox and Tanuki Lore in Old Japan
and
Bunbuku Chagama 文福茶釜・分福茶釜, Lucky Tea Kettle Story
tanuki in Awa province 阿波の狸の話 Awa no Tanuki no Hanashi
Danzaburō Tanuki / Danuki 団三郎狸. Sado Island
Hage Tanuki / Danuki 禿狸 from Yashima 屋島 northeast Shikoku
Shibaemon Tanuki / Danuki 芝右衛門狸 of Awaji Island
Flying-Dragon Tanuki 飛龍狸 in red robe

MORE details are here :
source : Mark Schumacher

. Danzaburō Tanuki 団三郎狸 Danzaburo from Sado Island 佐渡 .

. kachikachi yama, Kachi-Kachi Yama かちかち山, The Crackling Mountain Story .







. otogibanashi dorei おとぎ話の土鈴
clay bells with motives of legends .

bunbuku chagama and kachikachi yama clay bells


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- quote -
The Awa Tanuki Gassen (阿波狸合戦) (also called the Awa no Tanuki Gassen (阿波の狸合戦) or the Kinchō Tanuki Gassen (金長狸合戦)) is a Japanese legend that takes place in the Awa Province (now Tokushima Prefecture).
The legend is about a great war between two tanuki powers.
Tanuki Kinchō (金長狸), and the bad one, Rokuemon (六右衛門狸),
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


source : 鈴木寿雄画


戸をたたく狸と秋をおしみけり
to o tataku tanuki to aki o oshimikeri
(1768)

with a badger
knocking at my door I lament
the passing of autumn


Buson wrote this poem while staying in Ibaraki, 結城市 Yuki town, where many Tanuki have been killed. So in honor of their souls he wrote another poem:

秋のくれ仏に化る狸かな
aki no kure hotoke ni bakeru tanuki kana

at the end of autumn
this badger poses
as a Buddha . . .


hotoke ni bakeru - signify a tanuki who got killed.
hotoke is a word used for a dead person or a corpse.
The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.


. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .


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Tanuki Sake

- - - - - and a set with cups to drink it







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. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .

. WKD : Tanuki and Kigo .


. Tohoku after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

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5 comments:

Gabi Greve - WKD said...

Masaoka Shiki

朧夜や狸群れたる古社
oboroyo ya tanuki muretaru furuyashiro

night with a hazy moon -
the badgers come together
at the old shrine

Gabi Greve - Kappa said...

Kappa and Tanuki
河童と狸

Gabi Greve - Darumapedia said...

Legend from Ehime 愛媛県
城辺町 Johen town


Once a grandpa who went to the forest to dig out bamboo shoots was bewitched by a Tanuki.
He was balancing up and down a log for hours and could not help it.
Then to get his revenge, one rainy evening, he pretended to be bewitched again, sat in the shade of a tree with his hair hangning down like a lady and waited for the Tanuki to show up. When the Tanuki came by, he killed him with his ax.

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Gabi Greve - Darumapedia said...

- Legends about Sankin Kotai and Daimyo Gyoretsu - - - - -
There are quite a few with the fox or badger. Sometimes they compare their ability in shapeshifting.

Gabi Greve said...

Sado Island Niigata
Danzaburō the Tanuki 団三郎狸 - Danzaburo-danuki

and
Gensuke オモヤの源助 Omoya no Gensuke from 真野町 Mano 新町 Shinmachi
Sabuto, Seki no Sabuto 関の寒戸 / 左武徒 Sabuto from Seki
Saikibo 新穂の才喜坊 / 財喜坊 Saikibo from Niibo
Zentatsu 赤泊徳和の禅達貉 Zentatsu Mujina from Tokuwa, Akadomari
.
MORE
.
http://heianperiodjapan.blogspot.jp/2015/11/sado-island-legends.html
.