- - ABC-INDEX - -

10/04/2011

Oni demon - INFO mayoke

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::  

  


Oni 鬼 demon, ogre, monster

A Japanese ONI should not be compared to a Christian devil (akuma 悪魔).

There are some special pages in the Daruma Museum about these oni:

General Introduction:

. Oni 鬼  the Japanese Demons ,


. Yookai 妖怪 Monsters and Demons .
bakemono 化け物  o-bake お化け, yuurei 幽霊 ghost


. Bakemono, O-Bake お化け Ghosts and Demons .
Yotsuya Kaidan, One Hundred Ghosts walking at Night 百鬼夜行
... Ghost Stories 怪談 kaidan



. kimon 鬼門を守る demon's gate .
the dangerous Northeast, the unlucky quarter

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 




. Mayoke men - Demons to ward off evil .


. Mayoke amulets from 晴明神社 Seimei Jinja shrines - Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

- ABC - List of ONI from the Prefectures

.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Akita

. Namahage なまはげ demon figures .


.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Ehime

. hamaki  破魔鬼 demon mask to ward off evil .
shrine Isono Jinja 伊曽乃神社, Saijo Town 西条

.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Fukui
Yoshizaki town 吉崎
吉崎の御坊鬼面 demon masks


.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Hokkaido

. Oni 登別の鬼 The Demons of Noboribetsu .

.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Kyoto
onimen, oni men 鬼面 demon masks


.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Mie
. Ushi-Oni 牛鬼 "bull-demon" .


.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Nagasaki
鬼凧 kite with demon
oniyoozu 鬼洋蝶 demon kite


..................................................................................................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Oita

Oni jinja 鬼神社 "Demon Shrine"

oni ema 鬼絵馬 votive tablets with demons



In 1919, Fujishima Shima 藤島ツマ san started making them. She put an outline on the wooden tablet and then painted it with ink.
Many now hang in the shrine, they are said to help cure headaches and illnes of the head 「頭の病気」. Hung at the entrance of your home, they ward off evil 「悪魔払い akumabarai, akuma barai - 悪魔退散 akuma taisan」.

This "Demon Shrine" is located in the compound of the Tenman Shrine of Shirakihama.

白木浜の天満社 - Oni Jinja 鬼神社
source : www.asahi-net.or.jp


In the main hall a lot of demon masks are shown:




A square ema, only in black.

- source : hidekawa/onijinjya.htm


..................................................................................................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Saitama
嵐山町鬼鎮神社 Shrine Kijin jinja at Ranzan
(Arashiyama)


oni no ema 鬼の絵馬 votive tablets of demons

hisshoo kigan 必勝祈願 to make a wish to win
jinsei hisshoo 人生必勝 to win in life

kigan jooju 祈願成就 prayer for realization of heartfelt wish

This is called an ema fuda 絵馬札 votive amulet, that you take home and pray to it every day. Homes near this shrine post this amulet at the entrance of the house to ward off evil and prevent fire.

During the Kamakura period, the samurai Hatakeyama Shigetada 畠山重忠 had his castle Sugeya joo 菅谷城 nearby and the shrine was at the KIMON direction to protect the castle. He decided to make the oni his friends and invite them to help him win battles against his enemies.



kanabo no omamori 金棒のお守り demon stick amulet


quote
Kijin Jinja: A different approach to Setsubun
February 3 is the traditional day for throwing beans to drive away 'oni,' but at one temple in Saitama, they invite those very monsters in with the good luck

The famous cry of the Setsubun tradition is "Fuku wa uchi! Oni wa soto!" ("In with good fortune, out with the oni!")
Casting out oni ogres might sound like something from the climax of a "J-Horror" film, but come February 3 every year, you'll hear the phrase said by nearly every homeowner in Japan. It's all part of the Setsubun ritual -- the annual tradition of purifying one's house and family in anticipation of the New Year.
If you're a father, chances are you'll be pulling on a monstrous oni mask and getting pelted with soybeans from your kids. Then afterwards, the tradition holds that you should eat the number of dried soybeans equal to your age in order to protect yourself from illness throughout the year.



Kijin Jinja: A different approach to Setsubun
Setsubun is celebrated in nearly identical ways across Japan, but there are a handful of shrines that venerate the oni devils themselves, such as the famous Kijin Jinja shrine in Saitama. Here the oni are welcomed inside along with the good fortune.

We can see what you're thinking: These shrines worship oni? Isn't that basically devil worship? Not exactly.

The concept might sound off the wall in the context of a monotheistic, good-versus-evil sort of belief system. But Japan is a land of innumerable deities, and the oni, while often misrepresented as 'demons' in translation, are actually far more complex than their frightening countenances might suggest.

The Kijin Jinja shrine has stood in Saitama prefecture for more than 800 years. The priests treat the oni as a god of triumph and victory. Samurai warriors prayed here before their battles. Now, in more peaceful times, students visit to pray for triumph over a different sort of adversary: their school entrance exams.

Those with serious prayers in need of fulfillment leave big iron clubs as offerings. This stems from the phrase "Oni ni kanabo" -- literally "an oni with an iron club," which is an idiom for "unbeatability" in Japanese.


"Fuku wa uchi! Oni wa uchi! Akuma soto!"

"In with good fortune! In with oni! And out with the devils!"

source : tokyo/play


The town of Mizunami 瑞浪市 in Gifu is also famous for its "Demon Rock", Oni Iwa 鬼岩.
And a Setsubun festival where the demons are called into the home to bring good luck.
In Mizunami , they say " Oni wa uchi 鬼は内 Fuku wa uchi 福は内".

Other shrines for the ONI of Japan:
鬼室神社       滋賀県日野町
鬼士別神社      北海道猿払村
鬼島神明社      山梨県鰺ヶ沢町
鬼神社         大分県大分市下白木
鬼神社         広島県西城町
鬼神社         山口県和木町
鬼神社         東京都板橋区宮本町
鬼生神社        福島県滝根村
鬼嶽稲荷神社      京都府大江町
鬼太神社        三重県四日市市
鬼鎮神社        埼玉県嵐山町
鬼塚神社        長崎県佐世保市
鬼塚神社        福岡県椎田町
厳鬼観音堂      青森県今別町
鬼林稲荷神社     埼玉県深谷市
鬼祠          北海道登別市
鬼丸神社        鹿児島県根占町
鬼丸神社        鹿児島県南大隅町
鬼丸神社        鹿児島県日吉町
鬼屋神明社       石川県輪島市


鬼鎮神社 Kijin Jinja :  埼玉県嵐山町

鬼のこと All about ONI
source : taro.hamazo.tv


. WKD : Setsubun Festival (February 3) 節分 .

..................................................................................................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Tochigi
. Dainichi son no kirei, oni no dorei 大日尊の鬼鈴
demon clay bell for Dainichi Nyorai .


.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Wakayama
. Ushi-Oni 牛鬼 "bull-demon" .

.................................................................................

. . . . . . . . . . Yamaguchi
. Mishima no oni yoozu 見島の鬼揚子
Oniyozu demon kite from Mishima island .


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 




. . . CLICK here for EMA Photos !
「鬼」の絵馬

. Reference .


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 



CLICK for more photos !

oni no dorei 鬼 土鈴 clay bells with demons

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


mayoke 魔除け to ward off evil
toonan yoke 盗難除け to ward off burglers, thieves, robbery





mayoke daishi 魔除大師
gooma daishi 降魔大師


. "Master Warding Off Evil" .

Ganzan Daishi 元三大師 at temple Jindai-Ji 深大寺


. toonanyoke Fudo 盗難除け不動 Fudo preventing theft and disaster .
Tokyo, 法号山 Hogozan 明王院 Myo-O-In 東覚寺 Togaku-Ji

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Katsushika Hokusai,
'The Talisman' (Mayoke)




The poem inscribed on this print is by Sanseitei Marumi:

Hatsuhikage Nioteru haru ni ōmi no ya
Kagami no yama o Miru mo mabayuki

In the rays
Of the Spring sun
On Lake Biwa
Mirror Mountain
Also glitters


source : british museum.org

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. Yakuyoke 厄除け to ward off evil .



. Tomobiki day 友引 .
On this day, - your own bad luck will affect your friends.


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


quote
Lucky And Unlucky Days in Japan
In the West, avoid making important moves on a Friday 13th. The day is considered unlucky and decisions made on that day will have unfortunate consequences.
For the Japanese, Friday 13th is just one of several unlucky days. The number 4 is unlucky because its pronunciation is the same as the word for "death". Therefore April 4th is unlucky (4th month, 4th day or 4-4). July 7th and August 8th (7-7 and 8-8) are considered lucky. In fact for the Japanese, every single day is associated with luck, misfortune, or something in between. Delicate planning is required to make sure important occasions happen on the best day.

This page explains 六曜 or Rokuyo, and the lucky and unlucky days of the Japanese Calendar. Their impact on weddings, hospital stays, funerals, baby booms and doing business in Japan is discussed.
source : by John Cochrane -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 




akuma no Daruma 悪魔 Daruma the Demon

- MORE netsuke with Akuma
- source : deadpool-shisui.blogspot








:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .


. Tohoku after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

No comments: