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5/07/2011

. Gifu Folk Toys

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Gifu Folk Art - 岐阜県 



old provinces of Hida 飛騨 and Mino 美濃 .

Shirakawa and Takayama 白河 高山.

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. Kato Gosuke 加藤五輔 (1839 – 1905) .
Mino ceramic artist, Ichinokura

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Ena village 恵那

. Mino Nakano tsuchi ningyoo 美濃中野土人形 clay dolls .

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Gero Onsen 下呂


shoofuku boo 招福棒 stick to bring good luck

. . . . . same as
iwaibo 祝い棒 festival stick
bondeko ぼんでこ fertility stick
. yome tataki 嫁叩き "hitting the bride" .


. Gero Onsen 下呂温泉 Gero Hot Spring Spa . Gifu

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Gifu town 岐阜市

Mieji 美江寺 Temple Mie-Ji
2 Chome-3 Miejicho, Gifu

dorei 美江寺の土鈴 clay bells / kaiko rei 美江寺蚕鈴 clay bells with silk worms

. WKD : Mie-Ji Matsuri 美江寺祭り Festival at Temple Mie-Ji
o-ko matsuri 美江寺御蚕祭 みえでら‐おこまつり - silk worm festival

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Gifu choochin 岐阜提灯 Chochin lanterns from Gifu



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The Egg shaped lantern is made of thin Japanese paper with candlelight inside, and is a beautiful craftwork item. It is an important piece that fits in well with many Japanese scenes throughout history. The paper uses the famous Mino-washi, (Mino Japanese paper) produced in Gifu prefecture and the frame is also made from a good quality bamboo harvested in the nearby region. The history records indicate that the local feudal lord of Owari presented Gifu lanterns to the Tokugawa government in the 17th century.

Bamboo strips are constructed to make a tube shape and Japanese paper is pasted around it. There is a tray at the bottom for a candle. The paper makes the light grow brighter and gives one the ability to see better when walking through dark streets at night. When you place it at the door of your house, it functions as a nice porch light.

The lantern is not heavy and the paper shields the candlelight from being extinguished by winds. Openings of the top and bottom of the lantern help air circulate freely. The paper has cresses, like an accordion, making it easy to store when you are not using it.

Until the 17th century, the lanterns and candles were very expensive. Therefore, they were mainly used for a few occasions such as for religious ceremonies, as lighting accessories on the feet of nobles and samurai, and for police patrols at night. By the first half of the 19th century, mass production of candles became possible, which allowed lanterns to be more accessible among ordinary citizens. It was also the time of a relative calm and stable society where people were able to develop a taste of beauty and elegance. In the latter half of the 19th century, when international commerce began to become more active, the lanterns became popular for their ability to illuminate flowers and other romantic painting.

Gifu Lanterns come in different shapes and designs. But the one with an upside down egg shape and beautiful painting on the lampshade is considered to be the most standard. A Gifu Lantern can be an ideal decorative piece for your home, with or without light inside.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts -

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. Gifu wagasa 岐阜和傘 paper umbrellas .

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Kani 可児(かに)




Hiromi tsuchi ningyoo 広見土人形 clay dolls from Hiromi
This dancer girl resembles the clay dolls made in Asahi, Aichi prefecture.
愛知県の旭土人形

. . . CLICK here for more Photos !





Hime tsuchi ningyoo 姫土人形 clay dolls from Hime
The small village of Himejimura 姫路村 is often mixed up with the more famous town of Himeji, so they prefere the spelling HIME ヒメ.
The dolls were last made by Watanabe Kazuo 渡辺一夫, who died in 1981.
The dolls are painted with many fine details.

. . . CLICK here for more Photos !


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Mizunami town 瑞浪市

Ichihara tsuchi ningyoo 市原土人形 clay dolls from Ichihara


Daruma in the year of the Sheep

and

. Daruma and beckning cat .
Originally the craftsmen came from Mikawa.

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Making clay dolls started at the end of the Edo period. Farmers used the clay from the fields to make dolls in the winter time.




tsuchibina 土びな hina dolls for the Doll Festival in March. Merchants came to collect these dolls and sell them in Japan. In the best times there were more than 50 doll makers.
The business died down after WW II. Now there are very few makers in town.
source : www.city.mizunami.gifu.jp



source : blog.nihondorei.com

Momotaro 桃太郎 as a clay bell. A naked Momotaro is quite seldom.

MORE
. Momotaroo 桃太郎 Momotaro, the Peach Boy .


Mizunami 瑞浪市 is also famous for its "Demon Rock", Oni Iwa 鬼岩.
And a Setsubun festival where the demons are called into the home to bring good luck.
In Mizunami , they say " Oni wa uchi 鬼は内 Fuku wa uchi 福は内".

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Oogaki, Ogaki 大垣
. namazu osae なまずおさえ 鯰押え holding down a catfish .


. Shirakawa Daruma 白川だるま .


. Matsuo Basho in Ogaki .
Oku no Hosomichi, Station 43

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Takayama town, Hida Takayama 飛騨 高山


CLICK for more dolls from Iwa Mitsuko san.

Takayama tsuchi ningyoo 高山土人形 clay dolls
They were made in the spare time of many potters.
One of the pioneers was 岩信成 Iwa Nobunari, who studied doll making in Nagoya and Toyama.
He settled in Hida Takayama in 1922.
He also relied on the tradition of 山田焼 Yamada yaki from Hida.


Takayama tsuchi ningyoo no dorei 高山土人形の土鈴 clay bells


source : www.ryuss2.pvsa.mmrs.jp

made by 岩光子 Iwa Mitsuko, second generation doll maker.
She uses only natural material for firing her kiln and takes about one full day to fire the dolls.


- - - - - 高山人形 Takayama Ningyō
鯛抱き童子 ♥ Child Holding Sea Bream
太鼓持ち ♥ Child Holding Drum
神功皇后 ♥ Jingū-kōgō,Empress Consort Jingū
鯛乗り恵比寿 ♥ Ebisu on Sea Bream
牛乗り天神 ♥ Tenjin on Ox
- source : newday.sakura.ne.jp/claydolls -

- reference -


Hida Takayama Doll Festival

The doll (Hina) festival is celebrated one month later than the traditional Doll’s Day in Takayama so that the actual festival day is April 3. Approximately one month before the festival day, traditional (Hina) dolls such as clay dolls, antique dolls, Meiji era dolls, etc. are displayed at various locations throughout the city.

Hida Live Dolls Festival

Single women selected from all over Hida render service at a Shinto shrine, attired in costumes of the Empress, consort, ministers, and court ladies. The parade of Live Dolls, as it winds through the village, looks as if it were right out of a picture scroll of the Heian period. Rice cakes are scattered at the end of the festival.

- Spring festivals in Hida Takayama - Kinzojishi (Kinzo lion dance)
- source : hida.jp/english/event_spring -

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Matsukura Kannon kami ema 松倉観音紙絵馬
votive tables of horses made of paper


岐阜県高山市天性寺町39 / 39 Tenshojimachi, Takayama

Matsukura Kannon
Kannon to protect the horses. The secret statue is shown only every 7 years.

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A long time ago, farmers dedicated religious paper plaques (kami ema) for the Matsukura Kannon which is located in southwest Takayama. They wished for the safety of their cows and horses, or for an abundant harvest of silkworm cocoons. Sometimes they brought their cattle to the Kannon for their safety. The Ema Market is where these paper plaques are sold.

People believe if you put a dedicated ema on the wall of a house entrance, your family will be prosperous and healthy. The ema Market is around the 9th and 10th of August at Matsukura Kannon temple, Hon-machi 2 chome, Sogen Temple in the Higashiyama Teramachi.
You may purchase ema at the night market in front of Jinya from the 11th to 13th of August.
Farmers used to put ema outside as cows and horses worked outdoors. Meanwhile merchants put ema inside their houses to attract spiritual horses for the safety of their families and for business success. Nowadays, this is a common practice.

Paper ema were invented approximately 160 years ago. Until Taisyo era (1912-1926) people used visit Matsukura Kannon taking their actual cows and horses, however they were substituted with paper ema.
Not only locals but also many visitors from around the country have visited Matsukura Kannon, Yamazakura Shrine and Sogen Temple. It is one of the popular summer events in Hida Takayama and an important local custom related to folk beliefs.
Some ema are colourful hand drawn while others are woodblock prints with muted colors. In paper ema, horses bend their neck to pray for the kannon.
source : www.takayama-guide.com

photo resource : matukurakannon.htm


. Kannon Bosatsu 観音菩薩 .

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saru bobo 猿ぼぼ / saru baba ... "monkey baby doll"

lit. "monkey baby" sarubobo
They are made by a grandmother when the boy grandchild is born. They come with the wish for a happy family and good marriage and protect against evil.
The red face reminds of a baby monkey. They wear a small black scarf around the head.
In the Hida region, a baby is called "bobo" or "bobosa".

At the Yasaka Koshin Hall in Kyoto there is a similar red monkey doll, but bound together
kukurizaru, kukuri saru くくり猿
. . . CLICK here for Photos !

- quote -
- - - Etymology
Sarubobo literally translated from the Japanese as "a baby monkey". "Saru" is the Japanese word for monkey, and "bobo" is the word for baby in the dialect of Takayama.

There are several reasons why the amulet has this name. The Sarubobo is associated with three wishes:
-- Protection from bad things.
In Japanese, the English word "leave" translates as "saru", so possession of a sarubobo means that bad things will "saru"
-- A happy home, a good match

In Japanese, a happy home is "kanai enman", a good match is "ryo-en" (Another way of saying "saru" is "en".)
-- Having an easy delivery on birth. Monkeys' childbirth is easy.

The face of the sarubobo is traditionally red, as is the face of baby monkeys.
The differently coloured sarubobo are each associated with different wishes;
Blue sarubobo - for luck in study and work
Pink sarubobo - for luck in love
Green sarubobo - for luck in health
Yellow sarubobo - for luck in money
Black sarubobo - to remove bad luck

There is also a differently-shaped sarubobo called a "tobibobo."
- source : wikipedia

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. Karakuri ningyoo からくり人形 mechanical dolls .
for the Takayama festival floats


kubifuri shishi 首振り獅子 lion with wiggeling head


lion head from Aibetsu 愛別岐阜獅子舞
. Shishigashira 獅子頭 lion head mask .

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Mino kami ningyoo 美濃紙人形 dolls from Mino paper


source : blogs.yahoo.co.jp/kazukokabe

made by Saito san 斉藤道三

- quote
Mino washi (美濃和紙 Mino paper) is a type of Japanese paper created in Gifu Prefecture, Japan. In 1985, it was designated a Traditional Craft...
The origin of Mino washi can be traced back to the Nara period in eighth century Japan, when the high quality paper was first made in Mino Province.[1] Some of the original paper is still preserved in Shōsōin in the city of Nara in Nara Prefecture.[1] During the Heian period, government officials were dispatched to the area when paper standards, such as size and color, were first established.

During the first part of the Kamakura period, Mino washi was relatively unused and unknown; however, because of activities during the Nanboku-chō period and the Ōnin War, the low-cost Mino washi came into more widespread use. Also, the Toki clan, who served as the shugo of Mino Province at the time, promoted industries and paper production as a way of strengthening the area and their power. Many members of the monk and kuge classes in Japan would visit the area and use the paper, bringing it back to their homelands, increasing the distribution of the paper. Eventually, merchants began to sell the paper throughout Japan, too.

During the Edo period, regulations were put in place regarding sales of the paper and the area further flourished as a special production area. As uses for the paper increased (including in shōji and other common uses), the amount of production increased and it became a well-known paper.

Traditional craft of Gifu
Starting in the Edo period, the area surrounding Nagara Bridge in the city of Gifu became an important port to merchants traveling up and down the Nagara River. As a result, Mino washi and other goods that traveled from the upper-Mino region came ashore in the city and were sold in many tonya. Because of the high quality of the paper, it was used in many of the traditional crafts within the city, including lanterns (岐阜提灯 Gifu chōchin), umbrellas (岐阜和傘 Gifu wagasa) and fans (岐阜うちわ Gifu uchiwa).
Mino washi has become essential to the creation of these traditional crafts. The tonya in the Kawara-machi area of the city managed to survive the Gifu air raid during World War II, so the tradition continues today much as it has for hundreds of years.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !



. 紙屋文二郎 Kamiya Bunjiro (Bunziro) Paper Art Master .

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shirakaba ningyoo 白樺人形 dolls from birch wood




ukaibune, ukai fune 鵜飼舟 cormorand fishing boat
ukai ningyoo 鵜飼い人形 dolls of cormorant fishing

. ukai 鵜飼 (うかい) cormorant fishing .

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Takayama ittobori 高山一刀彫 woodcarving
ichii ittoobori 一位一刀彫 - Yew Wood Carvings


. Akubi あくび達磨 Daruma yawning .
made of wood from the local Ichi-I tree (一位)

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. Reference and Photos . Gangu Guide .

. Reference and Photos . Isamu Folk Toys .

. Reference and Photos . Yama no Ie . Folk Toys .



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source : www.hida-takumi.jp

飛騨の匠街道 Hida Craftsmen Road, covering the towns of
Takayama, Hida, Gero, Shirakawa
高山市、飛騨市、下呂市、白川村
The carpenters and craftsmen had developed a special code of training 律令制定 to keep up their high standard of work. They traveled all over Japan to help with important buildings since the Nara period.

“Hida no Takumi” 飛騨の匠 Hida’s Master Builders.
The Hida region has traditionally been a poor region and lacked the resources to pay the levies to the government at the time. However, this mountainous region had plenty of wood and woodworkers, carpenters, and builders. Therefore, instead of paying the levies of rice and grains, the Hida region sent their skilled carpenters to help build various buildings and woodworks in the capital. Eventually, these builders, carpenters, and laborers with their superb skills became known as “Hida no Takumi” or Hida’s Master Builders. They were involved with the building of some of the most famous temples built during the Nara period (e.g. Todai-ji, Yakushi-ji, Houryu-ji).
. . . . . Hida’s Master Builders are known for their ability to create buildings without use of nails. They fit one piece of wood into another using various techniques such as the tsugi-te.
source : www.satoyama-experience.com


. Master Carver Enku 円空 from Hida .


Hida no takumi 飛騨の匠
an expert carpenter or craftsman from Hida

Hida no daiku 飛騨の大工 carpenter from Hida, architect from Hida

These skilfull workers were also the subject of literature in the Konjaku Monogatari.
今昔物語 Tales of Ages Ages.

A History of the Japanese People

Kudara no Kawanari and Koze no Kanaoka, the first
Japanese painters to achieve great renown, flourished in the ninth
and tenth centuries, as did also a famous architect, Hida no Takumi.
source : www.gutenberg.org





The Takumikan Craft Museum (Hida No Takumi Bunkakan)
was built in 1989 and is dedicated to traditional Hida craftsmanship. The building was constructed by local carpenters using local lumber and traditional carpentry techniques that do not utilize nails.

The museum exhibits traditional carpenter tools and the various types of woods used. In an experience corner visitors can try to put together wooden puzzles and joints, which can be a surprisingly challenging task.
source : www.japan-guide.com


. akubi あくび達磨 Daruma yawning .
carved from the Master Carvers of Hida


. shokunin  職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .
Introducing the Edo period

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Shiga no Yakushi 志賀の薬師 Yakushi from Shiga village
Ganzōji 岩蔵寺 Ganzo-Ji - Iwanuma, Miyagi

In the year 861 慈覚大師 Jigaku Daishi founded the temple, bringing a statue of Yakushi Nyorai to be venerated here. During the construction there came a group of carpenters from Hida and promised to build the hall in one night.
But the villagers imitated the crow of a rooster long before daybreak, when the carpenters had just added one ceiling beam 天井板. They were quite angry and left the village. In front of the hall were the other beams waiting to be fixed and between them was a stone looking like a snake 蛇石. It was formed when an oxen pulling the wooden beams for the building stumbled.
. Yakushi Nyorai Legends from Miyagi .

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涼しさを飛騨の工が指図かな
suzushisa o Hida no takumi ga sashizu kana

to provide coolness
the carpenter from Hida
has all the instructions . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve


For Yasui, in 1694, who had a new building erected in his estate.

Okada Yasui 岡田野水 / 埜水
(? - 1743)
(~寛保3(1743)年3月22日)
A rich cloth merchant and tea master from Nagoya.
His real name was 岡田行胤, his nickname Sayu-Jiemon 佐右次衛門
Basho stayed at his home during Nozarashi Kiko in 1684, when Yasui was just 27 years. He was in the prime of his life but his wife died soon afterwards.
Most of his poems are collected in Arano 阿羅野 / あら野.
- Reference -


for coolness
the craftsman of Hida
has a blueprint

Tr. Shirane

Traces of Dreams: Landscape, Cultural Memory, and the Poetry of Bashō
source : books.google.co.jp


sashizu 指図 "instruction drawings" used by Japanese carpenters.
They can be quite simple on a thin board, with a horizontal line of beams marked 1 2 3 and a vertical lines marked with A B C, thus identifying each beam within the structure.
(This was done with the sashizu of my own home, the Daruma Do, and quite amazing!)


- - - - - another version by Basho reads:

涼しさの指図に見ゆる住まゐかな
suzushisa no sashizu ni miyuru sumai kana


. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 - Archives of the WKD .

Discussing the Translation on FB



When Yasui was departing for a journey, Basho wrote the following

見送りのうしろや寂し秋の風
miokuri no ushiro ya sabishi aki no kaze

I see you off
with your back in the distance - lonely
autumn wind

Tr. Gabi Greve

The cut marker YA is in the middle of line 2.

MORE - about feeling lonely - sabishi -
. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 - Archives of the WKD .

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飛騨山の質屋戸ざしぬ夜半の冬
hidayama no shichiya tozashinu yowa no fuyu

in the Hida mountains
the pawnshop is closed -
midnight in winter



二村に質屋一軒冬こだち
. futa-mura ni shichiya ikken fuyu kodachi .
one pawn shop for two villages

. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .


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. WASHOKU . - Regional Dishes from Gifu

MORE
. Gifu Folk Toys - this BLOG .


. Japan after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011


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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hida no Takumi -

Mencius:
孟子曰:
「大匠不為拙工改廢繩墨,羿不為拙射變其彀率。君子引而不發,躍如也。中道而立,能者從之。」

Mencius said,
"A great carpenter does not, for the sake of a clumsy artisan, either change or discard the marking line and ink.
[The legendary archer] Yi did not, for the sake of a clumsy shot, alter his method of shooting.
The prince (君子) draws things out, but does not discharge them [like shot arrows]. [Instead his approach] is like leaping forward. He is centered in the way and takes his stand there. Those who can, follow him."

Tr. John Tucker

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/pmjs/RDfxJiTXMkI

Gabi Greve - WKD said...

The Class System of Edo
mibun seido 身分制度 (みぶんせいど) status system, Klassensystem

http://edoflourishing.blogspot.jp/2013/05/mibun-seido-class-system.html

Gabi Greve - Darumapedia said...

Iwayadoo 不動院岩屋堂 Fudo-In Iwaya-Do
鳥取県八頭郡若桜町
Iwayado, Wakasa, Yazu District

The famous carpenters from Hida built this hall.
Hida no Takumi !!

Gabi Greve - Darumapedia said...

Hidari Jingoroo 左甚五郎 Hidari Jingoro

legends, sake, haiku . . .