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12/15/2013

orimono weaving

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orimono 織物 weaving - somemono 染物 dyeing - introduction -

orizome 織初 (おりぞめ) first weaving
..... hatsu hata, hatsuhata 初機(はつはた)first use of the loom
hata hajime 機始(はたはじめ)
hataba hajime 機場始(はたばはじめ)frist use of the loom room
hataya hajime 、機屋始(はたやはじめ)first use of the loom shed
This was done on the second of January.
Weaving was common in many areas in winter at home or in a special room.

hatsuzome 初染 (はつぞめ) first dyeing with colors
..... some hajime 染始(そめはじめ)
Farmers wifes used to dye their own threads and fabrics at home.


Festival of the Weaver Girl, Tanabata Star Festival


. WKD - weaving and dyeing - New Year Kigo .


. Sakiori 裂き織り/ 裂織 weaving with old cloth stripes - Introduction .

. Kasuri 絣 ikat patterns .

. Kimono 着物 Japanese traditional dress .

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後藤捷一


Dyeing and Weaving 染と織 
Extensive resource from all prefectures
- source : www.kimono.or.jp/dictionary


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Saori - さをり to weave a difference
SAORI®, the free-style hand weaving program for everyone!



SAORI was founded in 1968 by Misao Jo, a Japanese woman.
Today, it is practiced in more than 40 countries.
- source : www.saoriglobal.com


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- - - - - ABC - List of orimono and somemono from the Prefectures


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. . . . . . . . . . Hokkaido

yuukaraori 優佳良織 Yukara-Ori

- quote -
In Japan, there are many traditional textiles that have been passed down in each region for several hundred years including Kyoto’s Nishijin-ori textile and Fukuoka’s Hakata-ori textile. In contrast, Yukara-ori textile, which was created by Hokkaido’s Asahikawa city born textile artist Aya Kiuchi, has only a history of about 50 years but still has an impressively unique quality.



Kiuchi was intrigued by arts and crafts – particularly textiles – while studying at university in Tokyo, and after returning to Hokkaido, started researching and trial manufacturing textiles at the Hokkaido Industrial Research Institute. Up until then, in Hokkaido where there were no particular traditional arts and crafts, Kiuchi created the “Yukara-ori”, whose motif depicts Hokkaido’s nature throughout the seasons. Yukara, which is originally an Ainu word (Ainu is the language used by the indigenous people of Hokkaido), translates to “epic poem”. Kiuchi used this name in hopes of having the craft passed on in Hokkaido for a long time. In 1962, Kiuchi established a factory to manufacture Yukara-ori on a full scale. Her passionate energy and her enduring efforts soon bore fruit, and in 1977 she received the highest award at the Japan Folk Crafts Public Exhibition. Her work continued to be widely acclaimed both in and out of the country, and in 1978 she was awarded first place at the Hungarian International Textile Biennale.

The themes of the pieces that are typically used in Yukara-ori often feature the beautiful nature of Hokkaido such as glaciers and white skunk cabbage. Yukara-ori is made by an entirely hand-done process that starts from dyeing locally-made wool, which is the main material, in over 200 types of colors, then making hand-spun threads from it, after that weaving it using a loom, and finally ends with the fabric-fulling process. By skillfully combining numerous colors, an oil painting like textile is made.

Today, other than western and Japanese clothes, Yukara-ori is widely applied to various products ranging from fashion accessories such as bags and stoles to seat cushions and the back supports of chairs.
- source : japan-brand.jnto.go.jp/crafts -



Kiuchi Aya 木内綾
- reference source : www.yukaraori.com -

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. . . . . . . . . . Kagoshima

ooshima tsumugi 大島紬 Amami Oshima pongee


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. . . . . . . . . . Kyoto

Nishijin, Weaving from Kyoto 西陣織り


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. . . . . . . . . . Okinawa

. Bingata 紅型 from Okinawa .


日本の染織〈20〉沖縄の織物 Weaving in Okinawa


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. . . . . . . . . . Tochigi

Mashiko momen, 益子木綿 Mashiko cotton
Mooka momen 真岡木綿 Moka cotton



source : www.city.moka.tochigi.jp

もおか Moka Momen Kaikan 真岡木綿会館 Cotton Museum - 真岡市荒町5191番地

quote
1. Produced in Aramachi Moka City, Mashikomachi Hagagun, Tochigi Prefecture.

2. Characteristics:
Cotton fabric, hand woven with hand spun threads and dyed with indigo in the traditional way of "Moka Momen." Two kinds: striped fabric with pre-dyed threads and stencil dyed with indigo. Other colors than indigo are dyed with plant dyes such as "Benibana"(safflower), "Akane"(Rubia akane),"Shikon"(Rithospermum erythrorhyzon) and "Suo"(Caesalpinia sappan).

3. Uses:
Everyday clothing, table cloths, "Noren"( shop curtains).

4. History:
As cotton was widely planted in Mashiko-Moka area, cotton fabrics were woven in the late Edo Period and marketed as "Moka Momen"(Moka cotten). It was the representative white cotton fabric of the Edo Period. Moka was the center for trading cotton in this area, thus "Moka Cotton."They were delicate and silk like fabrics as cotton was hand spun and hand woven with the influence of "Yuki Tsumugi" pongee produced in Yuki, which is located near Moka. Special spinning wheels were used for producing thin hand spun threads. The production reached its height in the late Edo Period. However, it decreased drastically in the Meiji Period when machine spun cotton was imported and the Nagoya area began producing cotton fabrics.
In the early Showa Period there was no production.
An association for the maintenance and development of the Moka Momen started in 1986 reviving the tradition with full cooperation of local citizens. "Mashiko Momen" was originated by Hiroshi Higeta, a dyer who inherited 200 years of tradition, in 1960 with the aim of maintaining the tradition of Moka Cotton and indigo dyeing.
"Oka Momen" which is used today for summer dishabille, is machine woven cotton, resembling Moka Momen.

5. Dyeing Method
The indigo used for dyeing is the one produced here or in Awa (Tokushima Prefecture) and lime is added for deoxidizing the water insoluble indigo ball into water soluble.
source : www.kimono.or.jp/dictionary

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. . . . . . . . . . Tokyo 東京

Tama-ori, Tama Ori 多摩織 Woven Fabrics from Tama

- quote -
■Traditional Technologies and Techniques
There are five Tama Ori woven fabrics: omeshi-ori, tsumugi-ori, fuutsu-ori, kawaritsuzure-ori and mojiri-ori.
-1 - Omeshi-ori fabric お召織
is characterized by fine wrinkle patterns known as shibo on its surface.
- 2 - Tsumugi-ori fabric 及び紬織
has a unique texture defined by subtle convex-concave patterns.
- 3 - Fuutsu-ori fabric 風通織
(reversible-figured double weave), which is a type of double-woven fabric (niju-ori), has two layers that display patterns. The main pattern color on the front side becomes the background color on the back, resulting in a unique reversible pattern structure. Silk threads that have been either dyed 先染め (sakizome) or degummed 先練り (sakineri) in advance are woven using a Jacquard loom or dobby loom.
- 4- Kawaritsuzure-ori fabric 変り綴
is a modified form of satin weave. Multicolored weft threads (traverse threads) are used to weave complex, picture-like patterns. Pre-dyed (sakizome) silk threads are used, and the weave structure is a plain weave or variation of a plain weave.
- 5 - Mojiri-ori is a fabric 綟り織り
with loosely twisted threads in which the warp threads (longitudinal threads) are intertwined with one another and the weft threads (transverse threads) are then drawn through the weave. This results in gaps between each row of threads. It has a transparent quality similar to that of lace fabric. Silk threads that have been either dyed (sakizome) or degummed (sakineri) in advance are woven using a Jacquard loom.

■Traditionally Used Raw Materials
Raw silk, dupion silk or floss silk spun into thread



■History and Characteristics
Kaiko kau / kuwa no miyako no seiran / ichi no kariya ni / sawagu morobito
かいこ(蚕)飼ふ桑の都の青嵐市のかりやにさわぐ諸びと
(Raising silkworms / strong winds through fresh verdure in the City of Mulberries / rented spaces in the marketplace / merriment of the masses)

These words are from a poem sung during the Tensho Era (1573-1592). They describe the bustling activity of the castle town marketplace at 八王子 Hachioji. In Hachioji, which was known as the "City of Mulberries," sericulture (the raising of silkworms) and textile manufacturing have both long flourished; and these factors have contributed to the continued weaving of various textiles in the area.

Although the five different fabric types - omeshi-ori, tsumugi-ori, fuutsu-ori, kawaritsuzure-ori and mojiri-ori - are referred to collectively as Tama Ori today, they can all be considered the culmination of developments during Hachioji's long textiles history.

Leading weaving industries developed in locations with clean water, with famous production areas including the Kamo River in Kyoto and the Watarase River in Kiryu and Ashikaga. Hachioji, the home of Tama Ori weaving, is no exception to this rule. The city is surrounded by the Aki and Asa Rivers, which have headwaters within the borders of the former Bushu (Musashi), Soshu (Sagami) and Koshu (Kai) Provinces. The history of weaving in Hachioji has close ties with the waters of these rivers.

Hachioji's markets were formerly held on the fourth and eighth day of each month. After the Tokugawa (who later became the rulers of Japan) relocated to the Kanto area, it is believed that Hachioji's Yokoyama and Yokaichi Markets began to serve as important commercial venues for the textiles that became important local products. Hachioji was situated at the borders of Bushu and Koshu Provinces, making it a strategically important location in military terms. The Kanto head magistrate's office and junior officials (Sennin Doshin) were located in the city, and Hachioji served as the protector of the western part of Edo. These developments elevated the status of Hachioji.

The Tama Ori production process is distinctive in terms of the division of labor. The singular, quiet elegance of the woven fabrics results from the separation and specialization of production processes. Such processes include textile manufacturing, preparing punched cards (jacquard cards) for guiding looms, thread dyeing, gluing, warping (preparing reels to determine the spacing and placement of longitudinal threads), preparing kasuri (the weaving in of dyed fibers to create patterns and images), print-style dyeing, thread twisting, setting of loom frameworks, and the final treatment of cloth (fine adjustments made to improve its texture).

Hachioji Textile Fabric Manufacturing Cooperative Association
- source : sangyo-rodo.metro.tokyo.jp/shoko -


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. . . . . . . . . . Tottori and Shimane

Hirose kasuri 広瀬絣 Hirose Ikat
Izumo ori 出雲織 Izumo weaving


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